New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

Located inside the historic 1904 building that once housed the Breslin Hotel and is now home to New York’s Ace Hotel, The Breslin was created by chef April Bloomfield of the Spotted Pig fame.

A cross between a funky Southeast Asian dive bar and a hip West Village restaurant, Fatty Crab is half bright red walls and mismatched tableware, half exposed brick and minimalist lighting.

The lack of space, or chairs, allows you to focus on the perfect cup of coffee at Abraco's Espresso Bar in the East Village. In the tiny but cheerful bar, famous barista and co-owner Jamie McCormick grinds and brews each cup of coffee to order.

Bartender and experimentalist Eben Freeman and chef avant-gardist Sam Mason (both formerly of wd-50) are the duo behind this cocktail destination.

A large cow sculpture suspended in front of the brick façade marks the entrance of the Old Homestead, New York’s first steakhouse.

At Norma’s inside Le Parker Meridian hotel in Midtown, meals start with a shot of fruit smoothie before glasses of freshly squeezed orange juice (with complimentary refills) are offered.

EN Japanese Brasserie in the West Village offers izakaya dining in a setting explicitly crafted to evoke the Tokyo experience. Lofty ceilings and large windows give way to intricate wood carvings, floral centerpieces, and block-printed fabrics.

RUB

Short for Righteous Urban Barbeque, RUB is helmed by legendary Kansas City pit master Paul Clark, who grills up tender meat dishes like beef brisket, bacon chunks, and burnt ends at his Chelsea restaurant, and serves them by the pound in metal pie plates and Styrofoam cups.

Congee Village, on the outskirts of Chinatown, offers an extensive menu of more than 250 classic Cantonese dishes. As the name suggests, the restaurant is best known for its congee, or rice porridge; options include the chicken and black mushroom.

Now in its third home in Midtown, this nationally acclaimed restaurant was first established by Sirio Maccioni in 1974. Designed by Adam Tihany, the dining room subtly evokes the restaurant’s circus theme with a huge “big top” light fixture and a collection of porcelain monkeys.

Stephen Bruce opened the doors of this New York staple in 1954, charming patrons with his restaurant’s tiffany lamps, café-style small tables, and whimsical touches like the large hanging butterflies on the second floor.

This farmhouse-inspired restaurant in Prospect Heights brings a distinct countryside spirit to the city with displayed farm equipment, 19th-century portraits, empty bell jars, and filament bulbs inside a long, black and white dining room with high ceilings.

At this West Village eatery, Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich successfully recreate a traditional Roman osteria (a casual eatery serving wine and simple fare).