New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

The restaurant here has a fantastic view of the water and a chef that uses local ingredients in creative ways. Try the grilled lobster in citrus aioli with asparagus.

Housed in a former foodcart garage, this mostly-Korean hot spot offers a space far more expansive than most in this low-rise neighborhood.

13 vendors sell Honduran tacos, Mexican huaraches, Ecuadoran ceviche, and other delicious treats to spectators and players alike (a semi-pro league holds matches here every weekend).

 

open all day Sat. and Sun., mid-April to mid-October

Forced to move to a larger space in Bay Ridge to accommodate its growing popularity, this Mediterranean-style Middle Eastern restaurant run by Rawia Bishara serves home-style dishes based on her mother’s old-world recipes like ground lamb meatballs, stuffed grape leaves, and fatoush — a salad spi

Start your night with dinner at this pint-sized Mexican nook, with welcoming waitresses and colorfully painted walls. Try the tilapia baked in banana leaves with capers and olives, chicken simmered in mole sauce. Get here early—the 11 tables here fill up quickly.

Located in the New York Palace Hotel in a space formerly occupied by Le Cirque, Gilt seeks to reflect the early 20th century opulence of its setting, which once was the home of the wealthy railroad tycoon and investor Henry Villardi.

Latin tapas scene

Culinary moguls Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich bring high-end glamour to the Meatpacking District with Del Posto, a 24,000-square-foot Italian restaurant.

Located in Manhattan’s Upper East Side, the restaurant’s name is lit above the doorway on an almost neon-green sign.

Few New Yorkers know oysters the way Jay Shaffer does. The Long Island native even raises his own, on beds in Shinnecock Inlet (he sells them here as "Shaffer Cove" oysters).

A local favorite for champagne brunch, this small French bistro in the Meatpacking District is named after the Provençal town of Le Paradou, which means “paradise.” Housed in a 19th-century carriage house, the restaurant contains white-washed brick walls lined with vintage posters, tables crafted

Gig Shack serves "global surf cuisine," including fish tacos and a soft-shell crab BLT. Stick around long enough to watch a local musician drop in for an impromptu acoustic set.

New owner Jayma Cardoso has dialed back the Bacchanalian revelry and returned the Surf Lodge to its more mellow origins.

You know what sort of food to expect when you pass through the Mexican Mission-style doors of Gabriela's in the upper West Side. Inside are bright green and yellow seats, adobe walls, terracotta flooring, and folk art such as Dia de los Muertos figurines.