New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

True to the resort’s goal of togetherness, guests nosh side-by-side at long tables on a porch with views of Indian Lake.

Housed in a former storefront church in Red Hook, this renowned bakery is the brainchild of Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito, two veterans of the advertising industry.

Join the Third Wave of the New York coffee revolution. Joe the Art of Coffee cafe in the East Village is placing NYC on the map for top quality coffee.

Seasonal drink specialists

Although Moutarde passed as a mid-century French bistro in the 2009 film Julie & Julia, the Park Slope restaurant was renovated a year later to create a more modern look.

The Big Apple has become a barbecue battleground lately, but our award for the smokiest, juiciest cue goes to this big raucous space that seems to have been airlifted from Texas, lock, stock, and smokehouse.

Just a short hop eastward from Grand Central Station, installed on the basement level of an office building on East 43rd Street, is an authentic Japanese izakaya with a reputation for being one of the best sake bars in the United States.

Despite its nondescript façade and modest interior—furnished with tile floors, small tables, and colorful paintings—this casual midtown eatery is a local go-to for authentic Turkish cuisine.

This smartly decorated Japanese restaurant and bar with an Irish-pub feel benefits from its location in the heart of Chelsea’s gallery scene.

Max Dannis, a former management consultant, and his wife, architect Linda Gatter, opened the restaurant Local 111 in Philmont in 2006.

The Silverleaf Tavern in Murray Hill puts a new twist on the traditional neighborhood pub. The luxurious interior is accented with leather and exposed brick; high-back mahogany banquettes provide an intimate space for conversation.

Living up to the restaurant’s name, the servers at Hearth, located near Stuyvesant Town, are committed to providing old-fashioned, small town hospitality to their guests.

What would you get if you took a bunch of disparate elements of what makes eating in this city great and packed them into one tight space? Something like Ed Schoenfeld and Joe Ng’s lively New Yorkified Chinese spot, RedFarm.