New York

Restaurants in New York

Renowned owner-chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten brings Southeast Asian street fare to the gorgeous Spice Market in the Meatpacking District. One enters through an intricately carved wooden pagoda with lush red curtains.

Congee Village, on the outskirts of Chinatown, offers an extensive menu of more than 250 classic Cantonese dishes. As the name suggests, the restaurant is best known for its congee, or rice porridge; options include the chicken and black mushroom.

Now in its third home in Midtown, this nationally acclaimed restaurant was first established by Sirio Maccioni in 1974. Designed by Adam Tihany, the dining room subtly evokes the restaurant’s circus theme with a huge “big top” light fixture and a collection of porcelain monkeys.

Stephen Bruce opened the doors of this New York staple in 1954, charming patrons with his restaurant’s tiffany lamps, café-style small tables, and whimsical touches like the large hanging butterflies on the second floor.

This farmhouse-inspired restaurant in Prospect Heights brings a distinct countryside spirit to the city with displayed farm equipment, 19th-century portraits, empty bell jars, and filament bulbs inside a long, black and white dining room with high ceilings.

At this West Village eatery, Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich successfully recreate a traditional Roman osteria (a casual eatery serving wine and simple fare).

A sushi place? For fried chicken? Wince all you like, but once you try the wildly eclectic twist on this southern delicacy, you’ll see. First, the chicken is dredged in a daring invention of matzoh meal, flour, paprika, togarashi peppers, cayenne, and sea salt.

Named after a style of country house found in the south of France, Mas is a French-inspired eatery in the heart of New York’s Greenwich Village. The ambiance is rustic chic, with unfinished wooden floorboards and paneling and low lighting.

Although located in Chelsea, this Parisian style patisserie has a long glass case filled with sweets ranging from fruit tarts to fluffy almond meringue to triple chocolate mousse cake.

Donatella Arpaia and Michael Psilakis of New York’s perennially packed Kefi restaurant are behind this informal Italian kitchen. Not to be missed—Psilakis’s signature gnudi with crispy prosciutto and truffle butter.

A modest exterior (the red awning is as flashy as it gets) makes it easy to look past this unique little McDougal Street eatery, which has had SoHo buzzing since its mid '90s debut. 12 Chairs is a welcome departure for diners seeking " a quick, casual something" that isn't pizza or burgers.

The Hampton Chutney Co. in SoHo serves hot, crispy dosas and doughy uttapas, but it's the fresh, homemade chutneys that make this Indian fare stand out.

Everyone goes to Swoon, to the point where it’s impossible to imagine the town without its pressed-tin ceilings and tattooed and eyebrow-pierced waiters catering smartly to the patrons whose steady conversations thrum their way from Manhattan’s TriBeCa to Hudson’s Warren Street.

Some New Yorkers cite Papaya King as the penultimate hot dog, but for many natives, there's no substitute for Gray's Papaya. Gray's may have been a latecomer—it was established in 1973, more than 40 years after the original Papaya King—but it serves an even tastier product than its competitor.

The original location in a growing chain of panini-centric restaurants, Press 195 in trendy Park Slope was developed by college friends Brian Karp, Chris Evans, and Jimmy Volz.