New York

Restaurants in New York

What Great New York Noodle Town in Chinatown lacks in decor, it makes up for in cheap, but good food and speedy service. Hanging meats and chopping blocks take up the front part of this Chinese restaurant and no-frills tables fills the rest.

Even those not in the neighborhood don't mind the trek over to the East Village for the ultra-thin crust of Gruppo’s pies. A simple red awning with the restaurant’s name beckons those off Ave. B into the low-lit dining room with exposed brick walls and wooden tables, typical of a pizzeria.

Lunch on smoked-duck salad or French onion soup on the broad, sunny deck overlooking Wagner’s vineyards.

Located in the renowned Modern restaurant at MoMA, the Bar Room is the livelier, more casual counterpart to the Dining Room.

Located on the ground floor of the Carlyle Hotel, this Upper East Side institution is known for headlining the top musical talents, including the legendary Bobby Short, who played at the venue for more than 30 years.

Let this cocktail haven take you back to the '20s with specialty drinks created to impress. Make sure to take note of the address.

Simple and understated describes both the decor and food at Omai in Chelsea. Black chairs, white tablecloths, and softly glowing lanterns adorn this Vietnamese restaurant.

Donatella Arpaia and Michael Psilakis of New York’s perennially packed Kefi restaurant are behind this informal Italian kitchen. Not to be missed—Psilakis’s signature gnudi with crispy prosciutto and truffle butter.

Located on the ground floor of a brick row building, the interior of this popular spot is styled as an easygoing bistro, with simple wood floors and seating, soft lighting, a copper bar, and plant-filled wall nooks.

Fans of Law & Order will recognize the squat brick building and neon-yellow sign of Hector's Cafe and Diner in the Meatpacking District.

Everyone goes to Swoon, to the point where it’s impossible to imagine the town without its pressed-tin ceilings and tattooed and eyebrow-pierced waiters catering smartly to the patrons whose steady conversations thrum their way from Manhattan’s TriBeCa to Hudson’s Warren Street.

Portuguese-American chef George Mendes’s menu (the most perfect salt-cod croquettes west of Iberia; refined-rustic rice studded with bits of chorizo, olives, and duck confit and cracklings) is a succession of highs.

Walking into Megu in Tribeca, you might be forgiven for thinking you’d mistakenly entered a museum, gallery, cultural center, or all of the above.