New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

Although this bar in Brooklyn’s Cobble Hill neighborhood does not actually sell tobacco, its spirit draws from the iconic shops, kiosks, and annexes that populate the streets of France, making it a meeting point for the city’s French expatriate community.

Named after a variety of small, green olives, Picholine is the first restaurant owned by famed chef Terrance Brennan, who formerly served as a saucier at the renowned Le Cirque restaurant.

Restaurateur David Burke has created a two-faced restaurant spanning the 59th Street side of the iconic Midtown Bloomingdales.

A favorite on the Upper East Side (due mostly to the lack of Vietnamese options), Vermicelli offers the standard fare and take out service like most restaurants of its kind; however, it differs in that it creates a more upscale dining experience with worn wood floors, clothed tables, and maroon v

As willfully under the radar as an after-hours club, this unassuming West Village sushi bar occupies an unmarked storefront a block from Washington Square Park and stone's throw from the 4th Street subway station.

Chef-owner Andrew Carmellini brings robust Italian cooking to Locanda Verde, located in TriBeCa. Like an Italian taverna, the décor is simple and energetic, with a granite-topped bar, cafe tables, large French windows, and accents of dark wood.

Jack's Luxury Oyster Bar in the East Village gives a nod to New England with its knotty-pine bar, red and white checked walls, seascape paintings, and antique cupboard.

Located in Times Square inside the Michelangelo Hotel, this Italian restaurant was designed by Italian architect Andrea Auletta and boasts bleached French white oak tables, imported red silks, velvets, and gold leaf..

Dinner at Torrisi Italian Specialties represents some of the best Italian dining in the Nolita neighborhood, and for those who know Mulberry Street, that's saying quite a lot. Less upscale and stuffy, Torrisi serves a meal more akin to a family Sunday supper replete with six courses.

Thirty-five years ago, Eileen Weinberg opened a take-out eatery under an arcade on the western edge of the Broadway Theatre District, where she offered home-style comfort food at a gourmet level and used only the freshest ingredients.