New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

Seasonal drink specialists

Although Moutarde passed as a mid-century French bistro in the 2009 film Julie & Julia, the Park Slope restaurant was renovated a year later to create a more modern look.

The Big Apple has become a barbecue battleground lately, but our award for the smokiest, juiciest cue goes to this big raucous space that seems to have been airlifted from Texas, lock, stock, and smokehouse.

Sometimes it takes an extreme focus to bring about perfection. Such is the case for Pommes Frites in the East Village. True to its name, it only sells fries, but these are fries prepared the Belgian way: fried once for cooking and then twice for a golden color and perfect crispness.

Styled after a country estate, restaurateur Keith McNally’s Waverly Place trattoria frames its rustic furnishings—farmhouse-style tables and chairs and old wooden cabinets—within a space that features weathered brick columns and wooden ceiling beams warmly illuminated by candlestick-shade chandel

Although this bar in Brooklyn’s Cobble Hill neighborhood does not actually sell tobacco, its spirit draws from the iconic shops, kiosks, and annexes that populate the streets of France, making it a meeting point for the city’s French expatriate community.

Named after a variety of small, green olives, Picholine is the first restaurant owned by famed chef Terrance Brennan, who formerly served as a saucier at the renowned Le Cirque restaurant.

Restaurateur David Burke has created a two-faced restaurant spanning the 59th Street side of the iconic Midtown Bloomingdales.

A favorite on the Upper East Side (due mostly to the lack of Vietnamese options), Vermicelli offers the standard fare and take out service like most restaurants of its kind; however, it differs in that it creates a more upscale dining experience with worn wood floors, clothed tables, and maroon v

Casual, cajun-accented seafood. (Seasonal.)

Considered one of New York’s elite restaurants, Le Bernardin is the epitome of a chic, white-tablecloth French restaurant in Manhattan. With its honey-colored wood paneling and leather and steel chairs, the atmosphere exudes modern elegance.

This New York steakhouse is devoid of the traditional steakhouse décor (pictures of cows, cleavers, etc.) but still delivers what is expected of such an eatery: tender, flavorful steaks.