New York

Restaurants in New York

Living up to the restaurant’s name, the servers at Hearth, located near Stuyvesant Town, are committed to providing old-fashioned, small town hospitality to their guests.

In Ye Olde Days there was New York–style pizza. It was available by the floppy, foldable, roof-of-your-mouth-scalding slice on every corner from the Bronx to the Bowery, a fixture of city life as common as yellow taxis.

This inventive Japanese restaurant named after head chef Nobuyuki Matsuhisa is a Tribeca fixture. Nobu evokes the Japanese countryside with David Rockwell's interior design of natural textures, birch trees, wood floors, and river stones.

Peter Luger lets the steaks speak for themselves, and it works: the chain, including this tavern-like Williamsburg location, is consistently voted the best steakhouse in NYC and earned one Michelin star in 2012.

The Scene: One of the early dining clubs on the NYC scene, this five-year-old self-proclaimed “culinary speakeasy” is still smoking—thanks in large part to its warm and talented hosts: southerners Becky (from Florida) and Hayden (from North Carolina).

There's no hiding in this brightly lit, red- and gold-accented restaurant in Flushing. The authenticity—and thus, the heat—of Spicy & Tasty's Sichuan cuisine sets it apart from the abundance of other Asian restaurants in the area.

Husband-and-wife team Marco Moreira and Jo-Ann Makovitzky combined their backgrounds in sushi (Marco) and classic French cuisine (Jo-Ann) to open Union Square’s Tocqueville in 2000.

Located inside the historic 1904 building that once housed the Breslin Hotel and is now home to New York’s Ace Hotel, The Breslin was created by chef April Bloomfield of the Spotted Pig fame. This space features the original moldings and tile floors, and diners sit at closely packed tables.

Housed in a former storefront church in Red Hook, this renowned bakery is the brainchild of Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito, two veterans of the advertising industry.

Rolf Babiel opened the Midtown Hallo Berlin food cart in 1981 (the first of its kind in New York) and soon after, it became affectionately and widely known as as New York's "wurst pushcart." Start with the Freakin' Deal: one wurst and one Bavarian meatball sandwich on a crusty roll, with

Some New Yorkers cite Papaya King as the penultimate hot dog, but for many natives, there's no substitute for Gray's Papaya. Gray's may have been a latecomer—it was established in 1973, more than 40 years after the original Papaya King—but it serves an even tastier product than its competitor.