New York

Restaurants in New York

Tarallucci e Vino famously operates under the philosophy that "generally, appetizers and desserts are the most interesting items on the menu," and to that effect they warmly welcome patrons seeking no more than a stellar glass of wine and a plate of artisanal cheeses.

Whether you're dining beneath the trees on the stone patio or amidst the interior's clapboard ceiling and white walls carrying maps of the Atlantic, you may forget that you're in the East Village and not a New England fish shack.

Chef Iacopo Falai's brilliant trifecta of Italian eateries illuminates the culinary scene in SoHo. Although his main restaurant is temporarily closed, the cafe and bakery remain neighborhood favorites as they bring gourmet Italian fare to your power breakfast or lunch hour. The menu shines just a

The brit-inspired restaurant serves fancy grilled pork loin but also fish and chips and great pasta dishes.

Neon signs advertising Blue Smoke’s specialties—barbecue and jazz—mark the entrance of this bustling, roadhouse-style eatery in the Flatiron district. Inside, exposed brick walls and red vinyl booths are illuminated by star-shaped light fixtures, large windows, and slanted skylights.

Out in Williamsburg, Motorino’s owner, Mathieu Palombino, brings a serious résumé to the dough game. After working under culinary stars David Bouley and Laurent Tourondel, he shifted from Gallic to garlic and olive oil while learning to bake pizza certified by Verace Pizza Napoletana Americas.

With oversize porthole windows and glossy wood paneling, Soho’s Lure Fishbar resembles the cabin of a luxury yacht.

Situated on a prestigious stretch in the Upper East Side, Café Boulud shares real estate with the 1920’s Surrey Hotel. Chef Gavin Kaysen helms the kitchen at this celebrity-chef owned outpost. Décor is austere and takes the backseat to Kaysen’s meticulous French techniques.

Occupying the ground floors of two West Village townhouses is the exclusive Waverly Inn & Garden, first opened in 1920 and again in 2006 by Graydon Carter, editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair, along with Sean MacPherson, Eric Goode, and Emil Varda.

This small restaurant — painted in the bright yellow, green, and white of the Jamaican flag — specializes in Caribbean-style patties. The crispy pastries are stuffed with a mixture of allspice, black pepper, and a choice of seasoned ground beef, chicken, or cabbage and potatoes.