New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

Opened in September 2011, Saxon + Parole is named for successful racehorses, the former a brown thoroughbred stallion and the latter a brown pony, both from New York.

Named after a type of thyme that grows in the hills of Tuscany, Pepoline’s is a neighborhood trattoria in TriBeCa. The bi-level space run by chef-owners Patrizio Siddu and Enzo Pezone is comprised of tiled floors, light wood and brick accents, close-together tables, and a patio dining area.

Named after the legendary Harlem speakeasy, Red Rooster Harlem serves up sophisticated soul food. Menus reflect the diverse population of the neighborhood as well as the background of Swedish chef, Marcus Samuelsson as you’ll see on the menu which includes Fried Yard Bird and Helga’s Meatballs.

For more than 15 years, owner and executive chef William Mattiello has provided the Flatiron neighborhood with simple cuisine from his hometown Modena, Italy.

Though this pizza joint is technically in Greenpoint, Williamsburg’s quieter neighbor to the north, the Neopolitan-style pizza made in the domed white-tiled oven here is worth the 10-minute walk from “the Burg” for its simple but delicious thin-crusted pies.

It's unclear what is the greater attraction at Schiller's Liquor Bar in the lower East Side: the food, the innovative cocktails, or the people-watching.

Marcus Samuelsson’s African-inspired menu is captivating, from the mealie (cornmeal) breads with apricot blatjang (a chutney) to the lassi. What a delight to leave behind the ubiquitous flavors of the Mediterranean and discover these new tastes.

The beautiful compound of stone buildings 30 miles north of New York City was built as a private dairy by John D. Rockefeller Jr. in the 1930’s. “Mr. Rockefeller didn’t like the idea of pasteurized milk,” says Blue Hill vice president Irene Hamburger.

Located in the East Village, this intimate dining spot serves only one option: a prix fixe tasting menu. The two-star Michelin award winning Ko has only 12 seats along a kitchen counter. Along with his staff Chef Peter Serpico serves up innovative American cuisine and a daily rotating menu.

“Gem” is the most common word spoken by New Yorkers when discussing Heather and Scott Fratangelo’s unassuming restaurant in the Upper East Side. Serving authentic, heartfelt Italian and Mediterranean fare, Spigolo avoids all pretention in both décor and cuisine.