New York

Restaurants in New York

Flor de Mayo, on the Upper West Side, serves Chinese, Spanish and Peruvian cuisine from noon to midnight daily and enjoys a good reputation for its portion sizes and value. The pollo a la brasa, Peruvian rotisserie chicken, is a signature dish.

From the window of a cute-as-a-bug trailer emerge fat burritos and guacamole-topped quesadillas—and that’s just about the entire menu. Chow down at a picnic table in the shade at this summertime-only operation.

Owned by Toronto chef Susur Lee, Shang is an Asian-fusion eatery located in the Thompson Hotel on New York’s Lower East Side. The restaurant décor is decidedly Asian, with black lattices, walnut accents, and large lanterns; the menu, however, is less straightforward.

Rock star Moby started this Lower East Side cafe with his ex-girlfriend in response to the lack of vegetarian and vegan food in the area. With its soothing white-and-green color palette and natural lighting, it’s something of an oasis for laid-back living in the city.

Its clientele has included Harry Truman, Jackie Kennedy, and Cyndi Lauper (who sang impromptu with the house band last year), but one of the most celebrated locals at Bemelmans Bar, in the Carlyle, a Rosewood Hotel, was Ludwig Bemelmans himself.

Bryan Calvert, chef and co- owner of James in Brooklyn, New York, loves the versatility of his supermoist lemon pound cake: He uses it to make everything from French toast to a stuffing for baked apples.

Located on Restaurant Row on Frederick Douglass Boulevard, this Harlem eatery serves up refined American entrees alongside upgraded burgers, steak sandwiches, and truffled French fries.

Sea

As the first Brooklyn location of this small chain of Thai restaurants, it is also the largest at 7,500 square feet. Filled with materials like wood, brick, slate, concrete, and wrought iron, the dining room’s décor is a combination of industrial chic and art deco.

Walk through Clinton Street Baking Co.

The dining room is plushly appointed with velvety seats and heavy crimson drapes; the library bar is a glowing split-level imbibing bibliophile’s dream with a well-curated collection of books and pretty girls drinking coupes of cocktails with names like Satan’s Circus (rye, Thai bird chile–infuse