New York

Restaurants in New York

Whether you're dining beneath the trees on the stone patio or amidst the interior's clapboard ceiling and white walls carrying maps of the Atlantic, you may forget that you're in the East Village and not a New England fish shack.

Chef Iacopo Falai's brilliant trifecta of Italian eateries illuminates the culinary scene in SoHo. Although his main restaurant is temporarily closed, the cafe and bakery remain neighborhood favorites as they bring gourmet Italian fare to your power breakfast or lunch hour. The menu shines just a

Walking into Megu in Tribeca, you might be forgiven for thinking you’d mistakenly entered a museum, gallery, cultural center, or all of the above.

Opened by Venezuelan native Luis “Lucho” Quintero in 2004, El Cocotero offers guests fresh, authentic Venezuelan cuisine. Start your meal with a tropical juice like parchita or guanabana, and then enjoy some sweet plantains with orange glazed baked chicken and asado negro.

Easy to miss, this unassuming West Village restaurant is located inside an unmarked, 100-year-old brownstone. After entering through the dimly lit basement, diners step upstairs to the intimate, candle-lit dining room that feels reminiscent of a dinner party.

Situated on a prestigious stretch in the Upper East Side, Café Boulud shares real estate with the 1920’s Surrey Hotel. Chef Gavin Kaysen helms the kitchen at this celebrity-chef owned outpost. Décor is austere and takes the backseat to Kaysen’s meticulous French techniques.

Occupying the ground floors of two West Village townhouses is the exclusive Waverly Inn & Garden, first opened in 1920 and again in 2006 by Graydon Carter, editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair, along with Sean MacPherson, Eric Goode, and Emil Varda.

This small restaurant — painted in the bright yellow, green, and white of the Jamaican flag — specializes in Caribbean-style patties. The crispy pastries are stuffed with a mixture of allspice, black pepper, and a choice of seasoned ground beef, chicken, or cabbage and potatoes.

Tiny, cramped, and lively, this subterranean East Village eatery serves affordable Japanese fare in a no-frills dining room.

This bistro menu was created by Lee Hanson and Riad Nasr, chefs at Manhattan's Balthazar and Minetta Tavern. Their confit de canard with crispy fries cooked in duck fat transports you to Paris without making you leave the gate.

A small red car with the restaurant’s insignia located on the side is kept parked like a beacon in front of this French bistro.