New York

Restaurants in New York

This neighborhood bistro reflects the eclectic vibe of the Nolita neighborhood it calls home. The warm interior is accented by an unusual combination of white columns, sheer white curtains, cube-shaped chandeliers, and a mish-mash of wall hangings.

Iron Chef Bobby Flay brings his adventurous style of American nouveau cuisine to Bar Americain, located in midtown west.

As willfully under the radar as an after-hours club, this unassuming West Village sushi bar occupies an unmarked storefront a block from Washington Square Park and stone's throw from the 4th Street subway station.

Chef-owner Andrew Carmellini brings robust Italian cooking to Locanda Verde, located in Tribeca. Like an Italian taverna, the décor is simple and energetic, with a granite-topped bar, cafe tables, large French windows, and accents of dark wood.

Jack's Luxury Oyster Bar in the East Village gives a nod to New England with its knotty-pine bar, red and white checked walls, seascape paintings, and antique cupboard.

Located in Times Square inside the Michelangelo Hotel, this Italian restaurant was designed by Italian architect Andrea Auletta and boasts bleached French white oak tables, imported red silks, velvets, and gold leaf..

Dinner at Torrisi Italian Specialties represents some of the best Italian dining in the Nolita neighborhood, and for those who know Mulberry Street, that's saying quite a lot. Less upscale and stuffy, Torrisi serves a meal more akin to a family Sunday supper replete with six courses.

Thirty-five years ago, Eileen Weinberg opened a take-out eatery under an arcade on the western edge of the Broadway Theatre District, where she offered home-style comfort food at a gourmet level and used only the freshest ingredients.

From restaurateur Jack Lamb comes this tiny, 16-seat restaurant in the East Village. At Degustation, chef Wesley Genovart, who previously worked at Perry St, is the center of attention since all seats at the U-shaped counter face the open kitchen.

When it comes to wings, most people go buffalo. But next time you’re strolling down West 19th Street in the Flatiron District, stop by Tebaya for the Japanese version.

Home to the largest rooftop bar in the city, 230 Fifth is known for its panoramic views of the Manhattan skyline.

The consistent freshness of the fish is what keeps this East Village restaurant afloat in a city full of sushi options.