New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

Those looking for authentically vibrant South Indian vegetarian cooking will find nirvana at this Curry Hill lunch spot—a no-nonsense joint brightened with neon-pink and bright-orange panels.

Owned by Lynn Wagenknecht of Odeon fame, Café Cluny is a West Village bistro attracting diners with its eclectic décor and menu of simple, French-inspired cuisine. The dining room has closely-packed tables and a small corner bar lined with stools.

Stop in for a latte and panini and conversation with locals. The restaurant is named for Zuzu in It’s a Wonderful Life.

One of the city’s few remaining traditional French restaurants, La Grenouille is still a top choice for special occasion dining, more than half a century since its opening in 1962.

Owned by renowned chef Cyril Renaud, famous for his work at the now closed Fleur de Sel, Bar Breton is a casual French eatery in the Flatiron district. Inside, the dim restaurant is adorned with chalkboard menus and an unusual chandelier hung with colorful barware.

What started out as a small health food store and juice bar has grown into one of the city’s most popular vegan restaurants. Opened in 1984 on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, this eatery serves organic cuisine directly from the farm to the table using mostly locally grown products.

Housed on the main floor of a trendy Meatpacking District boutique hotel (also called the Standard) and under the High Line elevated public park, the Standard Grill offers New American cuisine by chef Dan Silverman, with signature dishes like charred octopus and marinated cobia.

Located in the Meatpacking District, Macelleria—Italian for “butcher shop”—is a Tuscan-style steakhouse situated in a former meat locker.

Just blocks from historic Washington Square sits Mario Batali's Otto Pizzeria and Enoteca. The bustling atmosphere is reminiscent of an Italian train station, complete with an old-fashioned schedule board.

You can't go wrong with a super-meaty, griddle-seared, quarter-pound burger made with beef from New York celebrity butcher Pat LaFrieda.

After training at such renowned French restaurants as Le Cirque, Daniel, and Chanterelle, chef Adam Perry Lang switched gears and opened this casual, cafeteria-style barbecue joint in Hell’s Kitchen.

Cheesemongers can sample more than 40 hand-made cheeses daily from around the world at this small Hell’s Kitchen wine bar. From a stinky blue to the smooth Brie, Casellula pairs each selection with proper condiments at its polished wood bar.

Andy Ricker is a Vermont native who fell in love with the food of Chiang Mai and northwest Thailand, opened a slew of restaurants in Portland, OR, and was named the James Beard Best Chef of the Northwest in 2011.