New York

Hotels in New York

From big city luxury hotels to countryside inns and lakeside lodges, the best New York hotels reflect their settings, whether you're sitting on a porch swing listening to the sounds of nature, or stepping out onto a busy street from the sleek lobby of a boutique hotel. Here are some highlights among the hotels in New York:

The Quin is located at 57th Street and 6th Avenue, this five-star beauty is a new star in Manhattan with easy access to 5th Avenue shopping, Columbus Circle and Central Park. The NoMad Hotel is a newish hotel in New York City, on 28th St. that embraces Old New York glamour in a rehabbed, turn-of-the-century building. The 168 unique rooms feature clawfoot tubs and atelier-inspired furniture. Aunt Louise’s Lake House is at the waters edge of Skaneateles Lake in the Finger Lakes area, an ultimate lake retreat that was built in 1840. Mohonk Mountain House is a legendary New York hotel that sits on the edge of Lake Mohonk in the Hudson Valley. The Victorian-era palace has been run by the same family since 1869. It’s also considered one of the top spa resorts in the United States.

Families return year after year to this 131-room lakefront complex in the Adirondack Mountains, drawn by the casual vibe and the pub-style food from the alfresco Cottage restaurant (open-faced roast beef sandwich, anyone?).

When trendsetting hotelier Ian Schrager opened the Royalton in 1988, he proved that a hotel could be as hot of a destination as a nightclub.

Stylish and compact, this former members-only club is a well-designed secret among midtown hotels. The 65 smallish rooms have combed-plaster walls, chocolate-marble showers, and Honduran mahogany accents; TV's placed behind two-way mirrors are clever space-savers.

Raising the opulence bar—even for a Four Seasons property—this soaring, sleek, I. M. Pei-designed tower epitomizes the cool high life in this coolest of American cities.

This inn’s breakfast has made a name for itself as one of Long Island’s most indulgent; don’t leave without sampling the lobster frittatas and crayfish and andouille étouffe omelettes.

In a landmark building on the Upper East Side, The Mark has been reimagined by French designer Jacques Grange as a soigné retreat. The striking black-and-white, Op Art lobby announces this is no longer a frumpy enclave for ladies who lunch.

The highlight of this animal farm is Apple, the potbellied pig whose bristly coat is an almost meditative pleasure to pet and who may very well try to eat you (in a good-natured piggy way). Human accommodations are entirely unpretentious, with rooms facing out to the distant peaks.

One of two lakeside inns in buildings owned by Wells College, the 1858 former residence was reimagined, top to toe, by American Girl doll creator Pleasant Rowland—part of a one-woman beautification campaign in a historic Finger Lakes town.

For families or extended stay travelers, Herrick Guest Suites one-bedroom and two-bedroom apartment suites provide the essential comforts of home.

One of the few independent hotels left in Manhattan, this 142-room bijou is cherished by Europeans (and savvy celebrities) for its intimacy and attentive staff.

The 300-room Hampton Inn Manhattan-Times Square North sits just minutes from New York’s Broadway theaters and popular attractions such as Rockefeller Center.

To get a true sense of the brand of luxury the Roosevelt Hotel has exemplified since opening in 1924, guests needn't venture past the lobby, where the gilded molding and columns, domed ceiling, Tiffany crystal chandelier, rich draperies, and balconies suggest a confident, dignified air.

One of the city’s first boutique hotels, Morgans was established by Studio 54 cofounder Ian Schrager in 1984. Renovated in 2008, the Murray Hill hotel juxtaposes a Renaissance-style façade with a contemporary interior by celebrated French designer Andrée Putnam.