New York

Hotels in New York

From big city luxury hotels to countryside inns and lakeside lodges, the best New York hotels reflect their settings, whether you're sitting on a porch swing listening to the sounds of nature, or stepping out onto a busy street from the sleek lobby of a boutique hotel. Here are some highlights among the hotels in New York:

The Quin is located at 57th Street and 6th Avenue, this five-star beauty is a new star in Manhattan with easy access to 5th Avenue shopping, Columbus Circle and Central Park. The NoMad Hotel is a newish hotel in New York City, on 28th St. that embraces Old New York glamour in a rehabbed, turn-of-the-century building. The 168 unique rooms feature clawfoot tubs and atelier-inspired furniture. Aunt Louise’s Lake House is at the waters edge of Skaneateles Lake in the Finger Lakes area, an ultimate lake retreat that was built in 1840. Mohonk Mountain House is a legendary New York hotel that sits on the edge of Lake Mohonk in the Hudson Valley. The Victorian-era palace has been run by the same family since 1869. It’s also considered one of the top spa resorts in the United States.

A 1904 Beaux-Arts tribute to 19th-century New York opulence has been pared down for the present, undergoing major renovations in 2008.

Founded by native Italians Margherita and Saffo, Bravo Holiday Residences manages a collection of villas for vacation rentals in Italy. The company rents villas in some of Italy’s most famous and picturesque regions, including the Amalfi Coast and Tuscany.

Built in 1909, this Federal-style resort makes a grand first impression thanks to 30-foot pillars and a lengthy walkway up to the entrance. Wide verandas overlook Otsego Lake (dubbed the Glimmerglass), the pool, and golf course.

Built and designed by its owners, the bed and breakfast has an eccentric Victorian vibe with rooms full of antiques.

Attracting a steady flow of celebrities (like its Meatpacking District sibling), this NoMad (north of Madison Square Park) hotel is within easy walking distance of Union Square, the Theatre District, and the Empire State Building. Throughout the 249-room hotel, décor makes a statement.

The Palm Court's famed stained-glass ceiling was re-created pane-for-pane with the help of New York City's Landmarks Preservation Commission.

Less glamorous than the Carlyle and less fanciful than the Plaza Athénée, the Lowell at first seems more conservative than its genteel Upper East Side neighbors.

Starting with the Philippe Starck-designed "decompression chamber" upon entry, with its escalator that moves you away from the streets of New York and into a main lobby of hanging ivy and 40-foot ceilings, the Hudson Hotel is art and achitecture combined to offer an escape from the city.

The north fork of Long Island—a 30-mile strip of oceanside plains dotted with farms and boutique wineries—is the quiet alternative to the nearby Hamptons. Overlooking trellises of grapevines, the four-room Shinn Estate Farmhouse is a place of respite for urban epicures.

Accessed via an private entrance off 50th Street, the Waldorf Towers hotel occupies floors 27 through 42 of the famed Waldorf=Astoria, an Art Deco landmark constructed in 1931.

Stay the night at the informal fishing camp–style lodge.

The 1,980-room Hilton New York generates much of its electric power and hot water from a PureCell power system, the only one of its kind in a New York City hotel.