New York

Hotels in New York

In a landmark building on the Upper East Side, The Mark has been reimagined by French designer Jacques Grange as a soigné retreat. The striking black-and-white, Op Art lobby announces this is no longer a frumpy enclave for ladies who lunch.

The highlight of this animal farm is Apple, the potbellied pig whose bristly coat is an almost meditative pleasure to pet and who may very well try to eat you (in a good-natured piggy way). Human accommodations are entirely unpretentious, with rooms facing out to the distant peaks.

Starting with the Philippe Starck-designed "decompression chamber" upon entry, with its escalator that moves you away from the streets of New York and into a main lobby of hanging ivy and 40-foot ceilings, the Hudson Hotel is art and achitecture combined to offer an escape from the city.

A high-design (and high-profile) herald of change in a once-grubby neighborhood, the glass-façaded Rivington soars above the old brick tenements of the Lower East Side.

The old-fashioned inn opened as the Hotel Monaquaga in 1928.

Most people don't think of midtown Manhattan as a place to chill out—but don't tell the Shoreham, a 177-room hotel that resembles a chic spa retreat.