New York

Hotels in New York

This creative B&B blends luxury with a rustic Brooklyn vibe.

This chic, glass-walled hotel abuts Williamsburg’s popular McCarren Park.

In a former factory by the waterfront of Willamsburg’s north side, this boutique property is hot as much for its 70 rooms as it is for its always-packed rooftop bar, The Ides, and it’s main floor restaurant, Reynard.

People are still buzzing about the “new Brooklyn,” where each artisan establishment seems to out-craft the next. And the Wythe—near the Williamsburg riverfront—has become the crown jewel of the borough’s renaissance.

 mar 17Stylish and compact, this former members-only club is a well-designed secret among midtown hotels. The 65 smallish rooms have combed-plaster walls, chocolate-marble showers, and Honduran mahogany accents; TV's placed behind two-way mirrors are clever space-savers.

The three-bedroom guesthouse at Apple Pond Farm comes with a fully equipped kitchen and plenty of toys that will delight the kids. Rooms from $420 (five people, two nights).

Who would stock a Manhattan mini-bar with a harmonica and furnish a bathroom with denim bathrobes?

You're on your own at this hip approximation of a Victorian pied-à-terre, but that's one of its selling points. Checking in means ringing the buzzer so a staff member can come up from the basement and hand you the key.

The Pierre, A Taj Hotel, New York refreshes the luxury and exclusivity that have long defined the hotel.

Opened in 2008, the Marcel at Gramercy is located in New York’s Gramercy Park. The mod-inspired hotel features 135 guest rooms furnished with custom beds and leather headboards, animal-print décor, and wireless Internet access.

Opened July 2010, this 36-story, glass paneled hotel towers above Times Square at 44th Street and 8th Avenue.

Built in 1903, the Mansfield Hotel is located just a few blocks from Times Square and was the home of reputed Great Gatsby inspiration Max von Gerlach.

This soaring black monolith on Columbus Circle, with its gold awning that seems to jut out into traffic, isn't the subtlest hotel in town—but then The Donald has never been known for his modesty.