New York

Things to do in New York

Given New York’s size and diversity, just narrowing down your list of things to do in New York may be challenging. See the city like the newcomers did: Start with a harbor tour and then head over to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty. The panoramic views from Lady Liberty never cease to be thrilling. Fifth Avenue has the biggest names (and often the biggest prices), so what to do in New York if you don’t have limitless funds? Wander the boutiques in Soho and Greenwich Village, and shops in Chinatown, for quirkier and more economical finds. Don’t dismiss the outer boroughs, either. Queens has Jackson Heights, which is gaining a large following for great ethnic food, and the Bronx has the famed Bronx Zoo, as well as historical sights such as Edgar Allan Poe Cottage, the author's former home on the Grand Concourse.

Seeing the big museums has always been one of the big things to do in New York—but it can be overwhelming. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art, narrow your visit to a few collections and then take your time with them. Another don’t-miss is the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), or smaller museums like the Frick Collection on the Upper East Side.

As a quick side trip from the side—and an alternative to the hyped Hamptons— head to Greenport, on the North Fork in Suffolk County. It has a quaint village or inns and shops, and a fun Maritime festival in September. The Catskills and the Adirondacks offer endless outdoor things to do in New York: hiking trails, cool springs, and plenty of lodges or cabins where you can sit on a quiet porch that feels worlds away from the big city.

Strange Factor: You don’t have to be dead to ride in a hearse through NYC.

Ninth Street Espresso keeps it simple: they serve specialty coffee. Opened in 2001, this flagship location in Alphabet City is marked only by a black awning with a white coffee cup, and the wrought-iron fence is often adorned with bikes.

Apple’s flagship store on Fifth Avenue in midtown Manhattan features an innovative exterior to match the gadgets inside. A glass cube marks the entrance to the subterranean shop, where customers descend the glass stairway to peruse the company’s revolutionary and wildly popular products.

A pioneer in the Chelsea art scene, Matthew Marks has acquired through the years 16,000 square feet of exhibit space, encompassing four galleries and a museum-style poster shop.

In New York’s Lower East Side, Kate McGregor's stylish boutique offers fashionable, eco-friendly clothing and accessories compatible with a range of budgets. The small shop’s racks are filled with eco-couture merchandise from designers such as Lara Miller, Camilla Norrback, H.

A New York City landmark, the Macy’s Herald Square store is a retail giant encompassing a city block and rising 10-and-a-half stories high.

Don't miss Ditch Plains, with its legendary offshore breaks and wide beach bracketed by jagged cliffs.

Set on an estate that once belonged to Eleanor Roosevelt’s grandparents, Kaatsbaan provides dance companies with studios and a performance space as large as the Metropolitan Opera stage. Check the calendar for shows from the likes of the American Ballet Theatre.

Not the place to pick up a $100 Schwinn, this tiny Chelsea bike shop (and gear-head hang-out) focuses on more high end options. Ground zero for cycling enthusiasts, the shop packs its inventory in from the floor to the ceiling, but it also offers soup-to-nuts repairs.

Situated in midtown Manhattan, this 35,000-square-foot health club is home to one of the city’s finest pools.

The creation of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Rockefeller Center was born during the Great Depression and has grown to become one of the city's most visited tourist attractions and thriving business hubs.