New York

Things to do in New York

Given New York’s size and diversity, just narrowing down your list of things to do in New York may be challenging. See the city like the newcomers did: Start with a harbor tour and then head over to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty. The panoramic views from Lady Liberty never cease to be thrilling. Fifth Avenue has the biggest names (and often the biggest prices), so what to do in New York if you don’t have limitless funds? Wander the boutiques in Soho and Greenwich Village, and shops in Chinatown, for quirkier and more economical finds. Don’t dismiss the outer boroughs, either. Queens has Jackson Heights, which is gaining a large following for great ethnic food, and the Bronx has the famed Bronx Zoo, as well as historical sights such as Edgar Allan Poe Cottage, the author's former home on the Grand Concourse.

Seeing the big museums has always been one of the big things to do in New York—but it can be overwhelming. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art, narrow your visit to a few collections and then take your time with them. Another don’t-miss is the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), or smaller museums like the Frick Collection on the Upper East Side.

As a quick side trip from the side—and an alternative to the hyped Hamptons— head to Greenport, on the North Fork in Suffolk County. It has a quaint village or inns and shops, and a fun Maritime festival in September. The Catskills and the Adirondacks offer endless outdoor things to do in New York: hiking trails, cool springs, and plenty of lodges or cabins where you can sit on a quiet porch that feels worlds away from the big city.

It’s kitschy. It’s fun. And it’s probably the only way you’re ever going to get your photograph taken with Morgan Freeman or Justin Bieber.

Offseason, hike the ski runs to see the entire yellow and bronze valley below.

Five Saks Fifth Avenue outposts around the U.S. are introducing a Zen vibe by partnering with two big names in the spa world: Canyon Ranch and Blue Lagoon. Each has developed its own private line of products, sourcing indigenous ingredients.

Housed inside a renovated horse stable in Tribeca, Smith & Mills is an urban bar with a vintage, industrial feel.

The Peninsula hotel's roofbar, Salon de Ning, is punctuated with global accents like Moroccan lanterns, Chinese daybeds, and Venetian mirrors. Nab a spot on the western terrace to catch a glimpse of the MOMA Sculpture Garden, and try the Baojing Vodka Martini.

Located directly under the Manhattan Bridge in Brooklyn’s DUMBO neighborhood, this former warehouse and popular site of wedding receptions offers plenty of space to spread out under its 20-foot ceilings, exposed pipes, wood pillars, and brick and plaster walls hung with original artwork.

This Japanese-run lounge is a hushed, romantic spot for a cocktail for two—that's because seating is limited, and in traditional style, drinkers (no groups larger than four, thank you very much) are admitted only if there's space for them to sit.

Newly opened Citi Field features a granite, brick, and limestone façade plus a sunlit rotunda honoring Brooklyn slugger Jackie Robinson. A trio of top Manhattan restaurateurs is catering to the Amazin’ faithful.

This wine and spirits shop in the Cobble Hill neighborhood of Brooklyn is beloved for many reasons — the great lengths its staff goes to please its customers, (first-timers get a tour of the store), an eclectic inventory that includes Middle Eastern and African products, seasonal seminars on bour

This bowling alley on the border of Williamsburg and Greenpoint opened less than a decade ago, but it manages to transport bowlers to the Midwest in the 1970’s, with its nostalgic décor and old-school scoring machines.

Climb trails through the northern peaks of the park or backcountry canoe in the St. Regis wilderness area.

One of the world's great museums, this Gothic Revival labyrinth tries to be all things to all art lovers—and with its expansion over the past two decades it often succeeds. The museum's breadth makes it dauntingly huge; grab a map and decide to focus on one wing at a time.