New York City

New York City Travel Guide

It’s impossible to take in everything New York City has to offer in a single trip, so when you’re traveling to the Big Apple, it’s wise to plan out an itinerary in advance. Want to sample all the best restaurants NYC has to offer? You can easily map your way from restaurant to restaurant, visiting all of New York’s trendiest eateries. Looking to spend some serious cash on designer duds? Hit the boutiques in SoHo and along Fifth Avenue, stopping only to ransack the racks at Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s. Hoping for the classic tourist experience? Visit the bright lights of Times Square, and make your way to Rockefeller Center, the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, and Central Park. You’ll never run out of things to do in New York City.

Arts and culture lovers should plan to visit New York’s many museums, including the Met, MoMA, and the Museum of Natural History – and cap it off with a visit to Chelsea, where you can peek into smaller galleries and artist’s studios. Sports fans looking for things to do in New York City shouldn’t miss a chance to watch the Yankees play at Yankee stadium, and grab a drink with like-minded fans in a Midtown sports bar. Partiers who visit New York City can take advantage of the city’s booming nightlife in trendy neighborhoods like the Meatpacking District, Greenwich Village, and Williamsburg, in Brooklyn. By the time you’ve worked your way through a fraction of what the Big Apple has to offer, you’ll be exhausted – but you’ll never want to leave.

Robin Williams, Conan O’Brien, and Tina Fey have all graced the stage of this heralded 150-seat comedy venue, where shows take place seven nights a week, the tickets are cheap, and there’s no drink minimum.

With occupiers, hipsters, yuppies, NYU-loafers Washington Square Park—an iconic downtown landmark with its own “Arc de Triomphe”—is a mosaic of Village characters.

This tiny bakery is locals’ go-to spot to for sweet and savory baked goods on the weekends. A buzzing group of bakers in blue work jumpsuits hum along to the likes of Fleetwood Mac while churning out flaky almond croissants and crusty baguettes, that can sell out by 10:30 a.m.

The department store’s Chelsea location closed down in 1996, but this airy, edgy outpost—set inside a warehouse satisfies the needs of high-fashion shoppers. Both men and women head here for everything from designer jeans to of-the-minute accessories.

New York’s best bagel: an impossible award given the excess of this mouth-watering bread product throughout the five boroughs. But Murray’s comes pretty close—and its collection of freshly made, handcrafted poppy-, sesame seed-, onion-, and garlic- bagels have wowed Villagers for over a decade.

Since the tiny shop’s designs started showing up in photos of starlets and rockers a decade ago, the neighborhood’s secret is out but still worth a visit. Here you’ll find great dresses that are feminine without being girly, and well-structured without being stiff.

This floating museum is housed in a former U.S. aircraft carrier that served in WWII and Vietnam War. The ship retired in 1982 and, in that same year, the museum was opened.

This home décor store is the kind of place you can get lost in for hours. Every inch of space (ceiling included) is overflowing with charming gift-worthy items, such as brightly colored Yves Delorme mohair throws, owl-shaped salt and pepper shakers, and Savon de Marseille soaps.

Since 1963, this three-screen cinema has showcased a canon of cult classics—not to mention an eclectic mix of edgier flicks. Want to re-watch Mulholland Drive on the big screen? You may be in luck.

Forget the clothes: the real lure is the Rem Koolhaas-designed store itself. Manhattan’s Prada flagship replaced the downtown branch of the Guggenheim Museum in 2001—and since then, architecture freaks (and, yes, fashionistas) have been flocking to the futuristic 23,000-square-foot store.