New York City

New York City Travel Guide

A serene nail salon that's beloved by beauty editors, TenOverTen is a spot where you'll feel more relaxed as soon as you walk in.

One of the neighborhood’s most popular draws, Brooklyn Brewery was one of the first craft brewers around when it opened in 1988. Today, it produces 26 styles throughout the year, and regularly hosts tours throughout the week.

It was only a matter of time before Williamsburg got its own winery. This one, with 18 locally made, award-winning wines, offers flights, curated cheese and charcuterie plates to accompany tastings, and communal seating to encourage sharing notes.

When Williamsburg was still bereft of a cinema, Nitehawk came in with a decidedly Brooklyn approach. It installed a bar and lounge on the main floor, for before- or after-show lingering. Upstairs, by the screening rooms, another bar serves guests while they wait to be seated.

Housing 50 NYC-themed lanes, Bowlmor is part bowling alley, part nightclub. Beyond knocking down pins over drinks, there’s also the Stadium Grill Sports Bar and Restaurant, run by celeb chef David Burke.

With seemingly countless galleries lining its streets, Chelsea is essentially a museum—one displaying everything from experimental art from up-and-comers to more staid works by longtime greats.

Tucked away on W. 12th Street, between University Street and Fifth Avenue, is this French-inspired café that has been serving up the neighborhood’s creamiest café au laits for years.

Located discreetly behind red metal gates in what at first glance appears to be a furniture shop, this beer bar has one of the neighborhood’s most extensive lists of craft beer on tap, in bottles and in a few casks that rotate out regularly.

Members show up regularly for continuing-ed classes or workouts in the 80,000-sq-ft gym, but this is hardly your average community center.

Once the site of a chapel on Peter Stuyvesant’s farm, St. Mark’s is more than just a church: the sanctuary does double duty as a performance space and plays as much a part in the neighborhood’s cultural history as in its history of worship.

Established in 1976, this non-profit is the largest in the world dedicated to the promotion of artist-made publications. Inside the brightly lit space, you’ll find 15,000 titles—plus rare reads.

Some buildings are born to be icons. With its unique triangular “iron” shape, Beaux-Arts styling and bragging rights as one of New York’s first skyscrapers, The Flatiron Building’s eternal fame was secured from the beginning.