New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

Seasonal drink specialists

The Hampton Chutney Co. in SoHo serves hot, crispy dosas and doughy uttapas, but it's the fresh, homemade chutneys that make this Indian fare stand out.

Organic, eco-friendly ice cream and fair-trade coffee help you feel virtuous while you indulge.

Co-founded by actor Robert De Niro, this inventive Japanese restaurant named after head chef Nobuyuki Matsuhisa stands at the top of the culinary food chain.

This small, easy-to-miss spot in Midtown East is just a few quick strides from Grand Central and is the ideal pit stop for a quick lunch break or relaxed dinner.

The second restaurant from April Bloomfield focuses on (what else?) seafood.

Inspired by the eponymous Milanese café established in the 1930’s, Sant Ambroeus serves authentic Italian fare for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

This New York steakhouse is devoid of the traditional steakhouse décor (pictures of cows, cleavers, etc.) but still delivers what is expected of such an eatery: tender, flavorful steaks.

This husband-and-wife-owned, Brooklyn-based pizzeria and restaurant is as much a lesson in simplistic food preparations as it is in environmental responsibility.

Opened by Venezuelan native Luis “Lucho” Quintero in 2004, El Cocotero offers guests fresh, authentic Venezuelan cuisine. Start your meal with a tropical juice like parchita or guanabana, and then enjoy some sweet plantains with orange glazed baked chicken and asado negro.

Just a short hop eastward from Grand Central Station, installed on the basement level of an office building on East 43rd Street, is an authentic Japanese izakaya with a reputation for being one of the best sake bars in the United States.

In 2005, Robert De Niro convinced famous Japanese chef Nobu Matsuhisa to bring his unique style of Asian fusion to midtown New York (De Niro is now a co-owner).