New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

L’Artusi, the second venture from Gabriel Thompson and Joe Campanale (the duo behind popular West Village restaurant Dell’anima), is a stylish Greenwich Village eatery serving Italian and Mediterranean inspired dishes.

The Burgers: The Big Apple’s best burgers are being served up a few blocks from each other in the East Village. At the gritty, no-attitude Black Iron Burger Shop, the house special, the Iron Horse, is made with two patties topped with grilled onions and horseradish cheddar.

Housed in a former storefront church in Red Hook, this renowned bakery is the brainchild of Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito, two veterans of the advertising industry.

In the heart of the Victorian-flavored neighborhood of Ditmas Park in central Brooklyn, this tiny, wood-beamed flower shop/bar attracts prosperous hipsters and ale lovers with one of the largest collections of craft brews in the city.

Dinner at Torrisi Italian Specialties represents some of the best Italian dining in the Nolita neighborhood, and for those who know Mulberry Street, that's saying quite a lot. Less upscale and stuffy, Torrisi serves a meal more akin to a family Sunday supper replete with six courses.

Located in the Meatpacking District, Macelleria—Italian for “butcher shop”—is a Tuscan-style steakhouse situated in a former meat locker.

Ronnybook Farms of Columbia County is fast becoming an NYC institution. Chelsea Market plays host to

The dining room is plushly appointed with velvety seats and heavy crimson drapes; the library bar is a glowing split-level imbibing bibliophile’s dream with a well-curated collection of books and pretty girls drinking coupes of cocktails with names like Satan’s Circus (rye, Thai bird chile–infuse

A Union Jack is displayed with stately pride in the front window of this traditional British restaurant, located along Park Slope's busy Fifth Avenue.

Resto, French slang for a casual restaurant, opened its doors in 2007. Owner Christian Pappanicholas wanted to create a casual Gramercy Park neighborhood spot with bar and sidewalk seating that served Belgian fare.

Beloved for its cozy tavernlike charm (think wooden beams and twiggy flower arrangements), creative cocktails, and the seductive aromas that waft from the open grill, this New York institution is just one reason for Danny Meyer’s fan base (Union Square Café and The Modern have only enhanced his m

This tiny Vietnamese sandwich shop in Sunset Park may appear somewhat disheveled and ramshackled, but its cheap, delicious sandwiches account for the intense crowding at lunch times.

Owned by Toronto chef Susur Lee, Shang is an Asian-fusion eatery located in the Thompson Hotel on New York’s Lower East Side. The restaurant décor is decidedly Asian, with black lattices, walnut accents, and large lanterns; the menu, however, is less straightforward.