New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

Ensconced in a converted garage in the Meatpacking District that once housed Rolls Royces, Barbuto serves brick oven Italian fare in a refreshingly simple atmosphere of red and white brick and clean, decorative lines.

Artie's Delicatessen, on the Upper West Side, is a New York-style deli that serves the flavors of 1930s homestyle Jewish cooking within a modern restaurant painted brightly and playing hip music.

Inoteca, located on a bustling corner in the lower East Side, offers an extensive wine selection, small-plate Italian dining, and (perhaps best of all) top notch people-watching.

Located just north of Prospect Park in Brooklyn, this pizzeria offers crispy, thin-crust slices of New York pie staples along with specialty versions like goat cheese and bruschetta on whole wheat, smoked mozzarella with provolone and prosciutto, and vodka sauce with fresh mozzarella.

For a Sex in the City moment, stop by Carrie's favorite restaurant, Pastis, in the Meatpacking District.

Now in residence at the St Regis Hotel, Chef Alain Ducasse's latest foray into the New York restaurant scene is a French wine restaurant.

For customers leaving this restaurant located in the Meatpacking District, it may be the décor and layout that sticks in the mind instead of the food: No matter how delicious the dishes may be, it’s hard to compete with the charm of three-level, 1848 brownstone town house.

After closing the original Harry's in 2003, the son of the original owner reopened and revived the space in 2006 by dividing it into two parts: one part formal steakhouse, one part casual café.

All sleek seamless perfection, the creamy space that once housed Montrachet is a new labor of love for canny restaurateur Drew Nieporent and British wunderkind chef Paul Liebrandt.

Those looking for authentically vibrant South Indian vegetarian cooking will find nirvana at this Curry Hill lunch spot—a no-nonsense joint brightened with neon-pink and bright-orange panels.

Named after a style of country house found in the south of France, Mas is a French-inspired eatery in the heart of New York’s Greenwich Village. The ambiance is rustic chic, with unfinished wooden floorboards and paneling and low lighting.

Few New Yorkers know oysters the way Jay Shaffer does. The Long Island native even raises his own, on beds in Shinnecock Inlet (he sells them here as "Shaffer Cove" oysters).

Named after the legendary Harlem speakeasy, Red Rooster Harlem serves up sophisticated soul food. Menus reflect the diverse population of the neighborhood as well as the background of Swedish chef, Marcus Samuelsson as you’ll see on the menu which includes Fried Yard Bird and Helga’s Meatballs.