New York City

Restaurants in New York City

The Scene: One of the early dining clubs on the NYC scene, this five-year-old self-proclaimed “culinary speakeasy” is still smoking—thanks in large part to its warm and talented hosts: southerners Becky (from Florida) and Hayden (from North Carolina).

This inviting Chelsea eatery, owned by Marc Meyer, Chris Paraskevaides, and Vicki Freeman, serves a menu of American- and Mediterranean-influenced comfort food. The dishes are reflective of chef Meyer’s appreciation of sustainable ingredients, local produce, and humanely-raised meats.

Born in Bangkok, chef Pam Panyasiri now brings the flavors of her homeland to Hell’s Kitchen at this no-frills, cash-only café.

Located in Morningside Heights, the Hungarian Pastry Shop is an assuming place often filled with students from nearby Columbia University indulging in coffee, tea and Hungarian baked goods. The long glass pastry counter is filled with cakes, tortes, mousses and more.

Tucked inside the iconic Plaza Hotel, Vienna’s legendary tea, coffee, and candy emporium has a classic selection of desserts like Sacher torte and Wiener Apfelstrudel studded with walnuts.

Opened in 2001 in New York City's Upper West Side, Ouest Restaurant serves up Nouveau American cuisine. Inside the well-lit dining room, red-and-white-striped pendant lamps hang from the vaulted ceiling, and circular red leather booths create an intimate experience.

Installed in a small, sunny storefront in East Harlem, Il Caffe Latte is a tidy, red-brick neighborhood café serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

From the location to the decor to the food, Jean-Georges in the Upper West Side is all about sophistication.

Donatella Arpaia and Michael Psilakis of New York’s perennially packed Kefi restaurant are behind this informal Italian kitchen. Not to be missed—Psilakis’s signature gnudi with crispy prosciutto and truffle butter.

Situated in the lobby of the Alex Hotel in Midtown, Riingo is a fusion of Asian and American cuisine and decor. Red walls, like Japanese lacquer, give accent to the white floors and ebony wood tables and chairs.

 

Anthos closed for business in August 2010.

What Great New York Noodle Town in Chinatown lacks in decor, it makes up for in cheap, but good food and speedy service. Hanging meats and chopping blocks take up the front part of this Chinese restaurant and no-frills tables fills the rest.