New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

Living up to the restaurant’s name, the servers at Hearth, located near Stuyvesant Town, are committed to providing old-fashioned, small town hospitality to their guests.

Named after a variety of small, green olives, Picholine is the first restaurant owned by famed chef Terrance Brennan, who formerly served as a saucier at the renowned Le Cirque restaurant.

This intimate and super-casual restaurant near the Williamsburg Bridge serves only one or two varieties a night, but the oysters are exceptionally fresh, always well-chosen (usually East Coast), and impeccably shucked.

Sprawling new-baroque drinking and dining venue

What began as a lone fruit and vegetable stand in 1933 is now a multistory gourmet grocery store in the Upper West Side, known for its vast displays of prime meats, artisan cheeses, fresh produce, and imported goods from across the globe.

Located on the ground floor of a brick row building, the interior of this popular spot is styled as an easygoing bistro, with simple wood floors and seating, soft lighting, a copper bar, and plant-filled wall nooks.

Residing in a Flatiron townhouse, the fish and seafood edition of Laurent Tourondel’s BLT franchise (others include BLT steak in Midtown and Gramercy's BLT prime) features walnut tables, an open kitchen, and a retractable glass roof on the third floor.

Some New Yorkers cite Papaya King as the penultimate hot dog, but for many natives, there's no substitute for Gray's Papaya. Gray's may have been a latecomer—it was established in 1973, more than 40 years after the original Papaya King—but it serves an even tastier product than its competitor.

Jampacked nightly despite its oversized proportions, this restaurant on the Upper West Side is a popular destination for reasonably priced Greek cuisine in hearty portions.

Cuban and Mexican prove a wining combination at this lively little Nolita café. The ambience starts with bright blue exterior and extends indoors with colorful tiles and a stainless steel counter, resulting in a kind of cross-cultural diner effect.

At this small Upper East Side omakase-only restaurant, diners are greeted by a sign that reads: Today's Special — Trust Me. The small establishment only seats about 30 people at both the bamboo sushi bar and wooden tables.

If this restaurant had an official slogan, it might be “come for the view, stay for the food.” Located on the 35th floor of the Time Warner Center in the Mandarin Oriental Hotel, Asiate presents a stunning view of Columbus Circle and Central Park through floor-to-ceiling windows.

The restaurant has the city’s most welcoming service, an organic earth-toned design, and a treasure in its creative, French Laundry–trained chef-owner John Fraser, whose haute-humble menu dazzles even with lamb’s tongue and brussels sprouts.