New York City

Restaurants in New York City

Situated off the beaten path (literally, it's in an alley off of a cobblestone street in Peck Slip), Acqua serves up authentic Italian cuisine and wines to the South Street Seaport area.

Portuguese-American chef George Mendes’s menu (the most perfect salt-cod croquettes west of Iberia; refined-rustic rice studded with bits of chorizo, olives, and duck confit and cracklings) is a succession of highs.

In a homey West Village setting, I had delicious crabmeat with tiny gnocchi in a silky turmeric-onion sauce.

We do love Jody Williams’s sweet, expertly curated, and dollhouse-scaled taste of idealized France in the West Village.

With fun, kitschy, Americana décor and a comfort-food-only menu, Chat n’ Chew is just the spot when you’ve got a craving for Mom’s mashed potatoes and she's 1,000 miles away.

This slick cafeteria is the brainchild of celebrity chef and Top Chef judge, Tom Colicchio. The sandwich-centric menu includes fresh renditions of familiar American fare with gourmet twists.

Few chefs have racked up as many accolades as Babbo’s Mario Batali.

This Old World trattoria, with its rustic wood floor, marble-topped bar, antique wooden tables, fancy chandeliers, textured walls, and wine bottle-lined shelves, seems a world (and a few decades) removed from its East 90 address, which puts it in thick of one of Manhattan's most affluent neighbor

Congee Village, on the outskirts of Chinatown, offers an extensive menu of more than 250 classic Cantonese dishes. As the name suggests, the restaurant is best known for its congee, or rice porridge; options include the chicken and black mushroom.

Owned by Jody Williams and Michael Bull, Gottino is, in Williams' own words, a “gastroteca,” or Italian gastropub. Located in New York City’s West Village, Gottino serves small plates alongside glasses of red and white wine (all from Italy, of course).

Located in Belmont at the corner of War Memorial Park, this casual, family-run Italian restaurant has been a neighborhood favorite for years. Inside, the restaurant’s tables are decorated with simple white tablecloths and silver flatware.

What would you get if you took a bunch of disparate elements of what makes eating in this city great and packed them into one tight space? Something like Ed Schoenfeld and Joe Ng’s lively New Yorkified Chinese spot, RedFarm.