New York City

Restaurants in New York City

Taunt curtains that are gathered in the middle line the windows of Primola, a neighborhood Italian restaurant in the Upper East Side.

Dating back over a century, this beer hall is a beloved Queens institution, particularly in the summer when seating is open in the expansive, twinkly light–framed outdoor garden.

What It’s Like: As classic as a string of pearls, this New York jewel—in a perfect setting on the East River under the Brooklyn Bridge—has romanced diners since it opened its doors in 1977.

TriBeCa’s resurgence has attracted a number of well-known restaurant openings to the downtown neighborhood, but none rival the nearly 10 years of planning that went into Brushstroke, where chef David Bouley tapped masters from the famed Tsuji cooking school in Osaka.

This rustic-yet-urbane cozy local favorite serves fabulous Italian food. Try the homemade cavatelli in sage brown butter with slices of spicy sausage. Then take home a can of their custom-blended spicy olive oil imported from Sicily.

A truly innovative dining concept, Obikà is a restaurant with a menu based entirely on the Mozzarella di Bufala Campana DOP, or mozzarella crafted in the Campania region of Italy.

Dedicated to creating “a new chocolate culture,” Max Brenner, who often refers to himself as "the bald man," opened this restaurant devoted solely to chocolate back in 2006.

Creative Indian-American

An homage to classic New York butcher shops, Quality Meats serves prime beef from two locally renowned butchers—Milton Abeles and Strassburger Meats.

A standout in a neighborhood crowded with Indian restaurants, this discreet establishment packs in the midtown Manhattan lunch crowd.

Simple and understated describes both the decor and food at Omai in Chelsea. Black chairs, white tablecloths, and softly glowing lanterns adorn this Vietnamese restaurant.

Savor the "cuisine of the sun" at Murray Hill's Artisanal Fromagerie and Bistro, where the Art Deco dining room recalls the calm, confident style of Paris circa 1930, from the antique, mural-sized painting on the back wall to the Parisian-style cheese cave.