New York City

Restaurants in New York City

The Burgers: The Big Apple’s best burgers are being served up a few blocks from each other in the East Village. At the gritty, no-attitude Black Iron Burger Shop, the house special, the Iron Horse, is made with two patties topped with grilled onions and horseradish cheddar.

In areas beloved by tourists such as the West Village, genuinely great coffee shops that still attract a local crowd are thin on the ground. This is a rare, and stellar, example—and the coffee is fantastic.

A husband-and-wife team transformed an old carriage house into a new cafe by moving their Midtown East flower shop around a corner. Inside this small bistro, whitewashed brick, white tablecloths, celery-colored upholstery, and greenery set the atmosphere.

Dinner at Torrisi Italian Specialties represents some of the best Italian dining in the Nolita neighborhood, and for those who know Mulberry Street, that's saying quite a lot. Less upscale and stuffy, Torrisi serves a meal more akin to a family Sunday supper replete with six courses.

With oversize porthole windows and glossy wood paneling, Soho’s Lure Fishbar resembles the cabin of a luxury yacht.

Joe Campanale seems too young to have been a sommelier at Babbo—he’s 24—but his Joe Campanale seems too young to have been a sommelier at Babbo—he’s 24—but his smart Italian wine list and herbal-infused cocktails at this always-packed new restaurant prove otherwise. Drinks $15.

A small red car with the restaurant’s insignia located on the side is kept parked like a beacon in front of this French bistro.

Modern-day Marie Antoinettes get their fix of haute-farmhouse chic at BLT Market, the newest (and cleverest) New York addition to Laurent Tourondel's ever-expanding BLT franchise.

The noodle bar that launched a career.

Located in the Four Seasons, the New York branch of celebrity chef Joël Robuchon's L’Atelier serves many of the signature French dishes made famous at the Paris original.

What good New Yorker doesn’t crave a 2 a.m. slice? Stroll to the Brooklyn outpost of Joe’s Pizza where Park Slope’s partiers finish their nights with tasty thin-crust renditions of classics like tomato, fresh mozzarella and basil, or barbeque chicken pizza.

Restaurateur David Burke has created a two-faced restaurant spanning the 59th Street side of the iconic Midtown Bloomingdales.

Frank Falcinelli and Frank Castronovo—known collectively by the Brooklyn culinary cognoscenti as “The Franks”—hold court at this hipster-Germanic bistro in the borough’s Cobble Hill neighborhood.

A tasting menu for two at superchef Thomas Keller's plushly impersonal 16-table dining room overlooking Columbus Circle will last three hours and set you back a cool 500 clams (and that’s not counting drinks). So why are reservations harder to come by than courtside seats for the Knicks?