New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

Barbarini’s Alimentari has been serving authentic Italian cuisine to South Street Seaport diners since 2006. The brick-walled restaurant has a few tiny tables under expansive skylights, which cultivate a bright ambiance framed by rusticity.

The latest from the burgeoning Momofuku restaurant empire, fiercely gifted executive chef Tien Ho offers French-Vietnamese cuisine in Midtown Manhattan.

Joe Campanale seems too young to have been a sommelier at Babbo—he’s 24—but his Joe Campanale seems too young to have been a sommelier at Babbo—he’s 24—but his smart Italian wine list and herbal-infused cocktails at this always-packed new restaurant prove otherwise. Drinks $15.

Andy Ricker is a Vermont native who fell in love with the food of Chiang Mai and northwest Thailand, opened a slew of restaurants in Portland, OR, and was named the James Beard Best Chef of the Northwest in 2011.

Located in the East Village, this intimate dining spot serves only one option: a prix fixe tasting menu. The two-star Michelin award winning Ko has only 12 seats along a kitchen counter. Along with his staff Chef Peter Serpico serves up innovative American cuisine and a daily rotating menu.

The Grill Room at the Four Seasons on East 52nd Street is a New York City classic—with the price tag to prove it.

What Great New York Noodle Town in Chinatown lacks in decor, it makes up for in cheap, but good food and speedy service. Hanging meats and chopping blocks take up the front part of this Chinese restaurant and no-frills tables fills the rest.

Celebrity chef Tom Colicchio, a regular Top Chef judge, has introduced an innovative dining concept to the private room of his New York City restaurant, Craft.

Decorated with a wall-hanging that reads, “Luscious tenderness and sweet compassion bring joy and contentment,” this bakery on the Upper West Side churns out fresh cream puffs every half-hour and fills them to order.

Chef-owner Andrew Carmellini brings robust Italian cooking to Locanda Verde, located in TriBeCa. Like an Italian taverna, the décor is simple and energetic, with a granite-topped bar, cafe tables, large French windows, and accents of dark wood.

Billed as the “soufflé sanctuary,” this classic French bistro is housed in TriBeCa’s 1891 Fleming Smith Warehouse, a tall structure with green-trimmed gables and Romanesque-style arches.