New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

Styled after a country estate, restaurateur Keith McNally’s Waverly Place trattoria frames its rustic furnishings—farmhouse-style tables and chairs and old wooden cabinets—within a space that features weathered brick columns and wooden ceiling beams warmly illuminated by candlestick-shade chandel

The restaurant has the city’s most welcoming service, an organic earth-toned design, and a treasure in its creative, French Laundry–trained chef-owner John Fraser, whose haute-humble menu dazzles even with lamb’s tongue and brussels sprouts.

Although this bar in Brooklyn’s Cobble Hill neighborhood does not actually sell tobacco, its spirit draws from the iconic shops, kiosks, and annexes that populate the streets of France, making it a meeting point for the city’s French expatriate community.

Part French brasserie and part American tavern, chef Daniel Boulud’s DBGB Kitchen and Bar (one of five Boulud-owned New York restaurants) is a lively, industrial-style eatery designed with polished cement floors, dark custom furniture, and a partially open kitchen.

The Sant Ambroeus Upper Eastside location seems as though it was designed from top-to-bottom to answer one question: "What do you get when you carve out a slice of Milan and import it on Madison Avenue?" Rich, warm colors reflect in the crystal chandeliers hanging over the wood-paneled banquette—

A cross between a funky Southeast Asian dive bar and a hip West Village restaurant, Fatty Crab is half bright red walls and mismatched tableware, half exposed brick and minimalist lighting.

Hard as it may be for homesick Catalonians or proud Basques to admit it, the best Spanish restaurant in town is run by a guy from Vermont named Seamus.

Situated in Chelsea’s Maritime Hotel, Matsuri fills an unusual niche in the Japanese restaurant scene. For starters, it’s enormous, with high vaulted ceilings, oversize paper lanterns, and a lengthy bar.

Husband-and-wife team Marco Moreira and Jo-Ann Makovitzky combined their backgrounds in sushi (Marco) and classic French cuisine (Jo-Ann) to open Union Square’s Tocqueville in 2000.

After training at such renowned French restaurants as Le Cirque, Daniel, and Chanterelle, chef Adam Perry Lang switched gears and opened this casual, cafeteria-style barbecue joint in Hell’s Kitchen.

A famous grump and short-order cook, Kenny Shopshin is one of those only-in-New-York characters tolerated for his culinary skills. Formerly of Shopshin's Diner in the West Village, the infamous grouch now plies his wares in a bright, but cramped, corner of the Essex Street Market.

If you ask someone where they want to go out to eat, few consider a museum. The proprietors of Modern, located inside the Museum of Modern Art, aim to change that.

The scene centers on live entertainment at Café Carlyle, where cabaret legend Bobby Short graced the stage for three decades before passing away in 2005.

Opened in 2001 in New York City's Upper West Side, Ouest Restaurant serves up Nouveau American cuisine. Inside the well-lit dining room, red-and-white-striped pendant lamps hang from the vaulted ceiling, and circular red leather booths create an intimate experience.