New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

Inspired by traditional Japanese izakayas (after-work drinking establishments), this Midtown East restaurant specializes in fresh sashimi as well as robata-style cooking on a charcoal grill.

Owned by Lynn Wagenknecht of Odeon fame, Café Cluny is a West Village bistro attracting diners with its eclectic décor and menu of simple, French-inspired cuisine. The dining room has closely-packed tables and a small corner bar lined with stools.

Translated, Parea means “a group of friends.” It’s a fitting name for this Flatiron neighborhood bistro, which serves small plates of Greek fare, meant to be shared amongst friends.

Latin tapas scene

Daring dishes are the primary focus at this Nolita restaurant, where executive chef Brad Farmerie combines American recipes, Antipodean ingredients, and spices from across the globe.

The consistent freshness of the fish is what keeps this East Village restaurant afloat in a city full of sushi options.

"Chinatown's Great NY Noodletown is one of the great late-night restaurants in Manhattan. Often, in the wee hours when all of New York's chefs are hungry and exhausted, you can find them gathered at a communal table here.

Located in Chelsea, Tia Pol serves hearty tapas and Spanish cuisine. Wide front doors open into the small, brick-walled bar and restaurant; above the bar, there is a selection of Spanish wines.

Located on the ground floor of the Carlyle Hotel, this Upper East Side institution is known for headlining the top musical talents, including the legendary Bobby Short, who played at the venue for more than 30 years.

This spare yet cozy East Village joint, endearingly decorated with old agricultural implements and populated by bearded neo-bohemians, is the brainchild of Peter Hoffman, who was championing sustainable agriculture at Savoy long before the current farm-to-table trend swept up New York.

Beginning in a small corner restaurant in SoHo, this brainchild of brother-chefs Bruce and Eric Bromberg has expanded throughout the city including Brooklyn’s Park Slope, where signature fish and seafood dishes like smoked trout and paella mix with house specialties Maine lobster sashimi and chop