New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

A sushi place? For fried chicken? Wince all you like, but once you try the wildly eclectic twist on this southern delicacy, you’ll see. First, the chicken is dredged in a daring invention of matzoh meal, flour, paprika, togarashi peppers, cayenne, and sea salt.

The Silverleaf Tavern in Murray Hill puts a new twist on the traditional neighborhood pub. The luxurious interior is accented with leather and exposed brick; high-back mahogany banquettes provide an intimate space for conversation.

The Big Apple has become a barbecue battleground lately, but our award for the smokiest, juiciest cue goes to this big raucous space that seems to have been airlifted from Texas, lock, stock, and smokehouse.

Legend has it that ice cream was invented in China about 1500 years ago, so it makes sense that one of Chinatown’s oldest businesses is the Chinese Ice Cream Factory.

Situated in the West Village, this family-owned Italian eatery uses recipes passed down for generations and produce from local farms to create fresh, authentic dishes.

A truly innovative dining concept, Obikà is a restaurant with a menu based entirely on the Mozzarella di Bufala Campana DOP, or mozzarella crafted in the Campania region of Italy.

Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto brings superb Japanese and Asian fusion cuisine to the Chelsea neighborhood with his trendy restaurant Morimoto.

Creative Indian-American

Situated on the border of SoHo and Little Italy, Despana is a café and gourmet food boutique specializing in Spanish cuisine. The black shelves are packed with cookbooks and the finest olive oils, vinegars and preserves from Spain.

A standout in a neighborhood crowded with Indian restaurants, this discreet establishment packs in the midtown Manhattan lunch crowd.

Multiethnic small plates, handcrafted cocktails, and late night DJ’s make the Stanton Social a trendy go-to for tapas in the Lower East Side. Established in 2005 by chef-owner Chris Santos, the restaurant has a three-level interior inspired by the 1940’s garment industry.

The Sant Ambroeus Upper Eastside location seems as though it was designed from top-to-bottom to answer one question: "What do you get when you carve out a slice of Milan and import it on Madison Avenue?" Rich, warm colors reflect in the crystal chandeliers hanging over the wood-paneled banquette—

The Ukrainian couple Wolodymyr and Olha Darmochawal traveled to New York to escape war in their own country, and inspired by fellow immigrants in the East Village, they opened a candy and newsstand in 1954 that eventually became the famous Veselka.

Tarallucci e Vino famously operates under the philosophy that "generally, appetizers and desserts are the most interesting items on the menu," and to that effect they warmly welcome patrons seeking no more than a stellar glass of wine and a plate of artisanal cheeses.