New York City

Restaurants in New York City

Andrew Carmellini (also behind Tribeca’s buzzed-about Locanda Verde) hits all the right notes at this platonic ideal of the American bistro: oysters, fried chicken with honey and butter–soaked biscuits, a towering sandwich of fried soft-shell crab and kaffir-curry sauce.

Consistently named among the best Mexican restaurants in Manhattan, El Paso has three uptown locations including this lively outpost on Lexington Avenue. “Authentic” is the restaurant’s watchword: the recipes are not Americanized, and the emphasis is on fresh, traditional ingredients.

Sea

As the first Brooklyn location of this small chain of Thai restaurants, it is also the largest at 7,500 square feet. Filled with materials like wood, brick, slate, concrete, and wrought iron, the dining room’s décor is a combination of industrial chic and art deco.

Art Deco-designed Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron District offers a unique method of ordering food. Customers choose four principal ingredients from a list of 16 and then share their thoughts and preferences regarding the meal.

If you haven’t found your neighborhood Vietnamese sandwich shop (everyone should have one), Nicky’s is a good place to begin. If it’s your first time in one of their locations, don’t let its size (tiny) and appearance (ramshackle) put you off. What lies inside is love at first bite.

Inside Manhattan’s Meatpacking district sits the massive, 16,000-square-foot Buddakan, an Asian fusion restaurant, in what used to be a Nabisco cookie factory.

Mod Mediterranean

More than 900 bottles of fine spirits, including the city’s largest scotch collection, line the backlit “bookshelves” at this Tribeca lounge.

Switzerland native Ralf Kuettel brings a bit of his homeland to New York City with Trestle on Tenth. The Chelsea restaurant offers traditional Swiss comfort food prepared with local ingredients and served in a no-frills dining room.

Located in the renowned Modern restaurant at MoMA, the Bar Room is the livelier, more casual counterpart to the Dining Room.

Stephen Bruce opened the doors of this New York staple in 1954, charming patrons with his restaurant’s tiffany lamps, café-style small tables, and whimsical touches like the large hanging butterflies on the second floor.

Rolf Babiel opened the Midtown Hallo Berlin food cart in 1981 (the first of its kind in New York) and soon after, it became affectionately and widely known as as New York's "wurst pushcart." Start with the Freakin' Deal: one wurst and one Bavarian meatball sandwich on a crusty roll, with

Boulud brings his bistro classics to New York's Lincoln Center neighborhood.

Sushi Seki is a comfortable, no-frills restaurant in the upper East Side, with green-tea colored walls and a plain wooden sushi bar. In lieu of a dazzlying atmosphere, the focus is on some of the most loved Japanese food in the city.