New York City

Restaurants in New York City

Although this bar in Brooklyn’s Cobble Hill neighborhood does not actually sell tobacco, its spirit draws from the iconic shops, kiosks, and annexes that populate the streets of France, making it a meeting point for the city’s French expatriate community.

The restaurant has the city’s most welcoming service, an organic earth-toned design, and a treasure in its creative, French Laundry–trained chef-owner John Fraser, whose haute-humble menu dazzles even with lamb’s tongue and brussels sprouts.

Part French brasserie and part American tavern, chef Daniel Boulud’s DBGB Kitchen and Bar (one of five Boulud-owned New York restaurants) is a lively, industrial-style eatery designed with polished cement floors, dark custom furniture, and a partially open kitchen.

A cross between a funky Southeast Asian dive bar and a hip West Village restaurant, Fatty Crab is half bright red walls and mismatched tableware, half exposed brick and minimalist lighting.

Husband-and-wife team Marco Moreira and Jo-Ann Makovitzky combined their backgrounds in sushi (Marco) and classic French cuisine (Jo-Ann) to open Union Square’s Tocqueville in 2000.

The Sant Ambroeus Upper Eastside location seems as though it was designed from top-to-bottom to answer one question: "What do you get when you carve out a slice of Milan and import it on Madison Avenue?" Rich, warm colors reflect in the crystal chandeliers hanging over the wood-paneled banquette—

Situated in Chelsea’s Maritime Hotel, Matsuri fills an unusual niche in the Japanese restaurant scene. For starters, it’s enormous, with high vaulted ceilings, oversize paper lanterns, and a lengthy bar.

A famous grump and short-order cook, Kenny Shopshin is one of those only-in-New-York characters tolerated for his culinary skills. Formerly of Shopshin's Diner in the West Village, the infamous grouch now plies his wares in a bright, but cramped, corner of the Essex Street Market.

Hard as it may be for homesick Catalonians or proud Basques to admit it, the best Spanish restaurant in town is run by a guy from Vermont named Seamus.

After training at such renowned French restaurants as Le Cirque, Daniel, and Chanterelle, chef Adam Perry Lang switched gears and opened this casual, cafeteria-style barbecue joint in Hell’s Kitchen.

The scene centers on live entertainment at Café Carlyle, where cabaret legend Bobby Short graced the stage for three decades before passing away in 2005.

If you ask someone where they want to go out to eat, few consider a museum. The proprietors of Modern, located inside the Museum of Modern Art, aim to change that.

Styled after a country estate, restaurateur Keith McNally’s Waverly Place trattoria frames its rustic furnishings—farmhouse-style tables and chairs and old wooden cabinets—within a space that features weathered brick columns and wooden ceiling beams warmly illuminated by candlestick-shade chandel

When it comes to wings, most people go buffalo. But next time you’re strolling down West 19th Street in the Flatiron District, stop by Tebaya for the Japanese version.