New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

Location, location, location: this is what the View certainly has. A glass elevator whisks diners up to the 48th floor to the only revolving rooftop restaurant in New York.

Located on West 43rd Street at the edge of Manhattan’s Theater District, this Southern Italian restaurant is easy to spot thanks to prominent blue signage that announces “Esca” (Italian for "bait") in bold white letters underneath slender, curved lamps.

Passing by this hole in the wall restaurant on Mosco Street in Chinatown, there are few exterior attributes to catch the eye. It’s tiny, with just a few shoddy stools at the counter, chipped walls, and service slightly worse than Seinfeld’s famous soup Nazi.

Start your night with dinner at this pint-sized Mexican nook, with welcoming waitresses and colorfully painted walls. Try the tilapia baked in banana leaves with capers and olives, chicken simmered in mole sauce. Get here early—the 11 tables here fill up quickly.

Now in its third home in Midtown, this nationally acclaimed restaurant was first established by Sirio Maccioni in 1974. Designed by Adam Tihany, the dining room subtly evokes the restaurant’s circus theme with a huge “big top” light fixture and a collection of porcelain monkeys.

This dimly lit Tribeca lounge offers Japanese-inspired cuisine, inventive cocktails, and live jazz music every Monday and Wednesday. Located down a flight of stairs, the sleek space is designed with hardwood floors, dark leather banquettes, and low candlelit tables.

Gabrielle Hamilton's gutsy food at her hole-in-the-wall café on the Lower East Side is inspired by classic American dishes. Don't miss the "Dutch Style" jumbo blueberry pancake baked in the oven—it's paired with Canadian bacon, sour cream and powdered sugar.

A favorite on the Upper East Side (due mostly to the lack of Vietnamese options), Vermicelli offers the standard fare and take out service like most restaurants of its kind; however, it differs in that it creates a more upscale dining experience with worn wood floors, clothed tables, and maroon v

Fanelli Café on Prince Street has been a SoHo tradition since 1922—a cozy corner spot with a simple, black street-level facade and English ivy vines that reach up to red brick walls of the floors above.

One of the toughest reservations in New York is also one of the most unlikely Michelin three-star establishments anywhere. First, it’s inside a gourmet grocery on an otherwise bland Brooklyn block.

Combining a lively, party-like atmosphere with gourmet Mexican cuisine, Dos Caminos is a popular spot for after-work drinks, birthday celebrations, and group dining.