New York City

Restaurants in New York City

Whether you're dining beneath the trees on the stone patio or amidst the interior's clapboard ceiling and white walls carrying maps of the Atlantic, you may forget that you're in the East Village and not a New England fish shack.

 

After this 10-table Italian eatery opened in 1896, locals who frequented the family-run establishment were given standing reservations that are still in place today.

Bryan Calvert, chef and co- owner of James in Brooklyn, New York, loves the versatility of his supermoist lemon pound cake: He uses it to make everything from French toast to a stuffing for baked apples.

Gusto Ristorante and Bar bills itself “as close to actually dining in Italy as it gets.” This West Village neighborhood eatery has won the loyalty of regulars with its emphasis on freshness; all pasta is made in-house, and the menu changes regularly to take advantage of seasonal produce.

Aureole is an upscale New York Theater District restaurant in the Bank of America Tower. It's the flagship for restaurant entrepreneur Charlie Palmer, who supports the farm-to-table food movement and specializes in Progressive American cuisine.

Located in the Upper West Side and, more importantly, on the top floor of the Museum of Arts and Design, Robert (named for famed party planner Robert Isabell) is predictably posh and trendy.

From homemade Belgian waffles to 30-plus Belgian beers—many of which are used to prepare authentic dishes—this Chelsea brasserie serves the best of Belgium’s traditional fare.

Location, location, location: this is what the View certainly has. A glass elevator whisks diners up to the 48th floor to the only revolving rooftop restaurant in New York.

Located on West 43rd Street at the edge of Manhattan’s Theater District, this Southern Italian restaurant is easy to spot thanks to prominent blue signage that announces “Esca” (Italian for "bait") in bold white letters underneath slender, curved lamps.

Passing by this hole in the wall restaurant on Mosco Street in Chinatown, there are few exterior attributes to catch the eye. It’s tiny, with just a few shoddy stools at the counter, chipped walls, and service slightly worse than Seinfeld’s famous soup Nazi.