New York City

Restaurants in New York City

Boulud brings his bistro classics to New York's Lincoln Center neighborhood.

This inventive Japanese restaurant named after head chef Nobuyuki Matsuhisa is a Tribeca fixture. Nobu evokes the Japanese countryside with David Rockwell's interior design of natural textures, birch trees, wood floors, and river stones.

Mark Isreal has been turning out what can only be described as craft doughnuts from this trendy, Lower East Side locale since 1994, but the basic recipes he used to put the Doughnut Plant on the map share a history that stretches all the way back to 1918, when Mark's grandfather, Herman, baked fo

Salumeria Rosi may be the only restaurant in the city with an in-house salumiere, who oversees the kitchen's selection of cured-meats and curates tasting platters.

Inspired by the eponymous Milanese café established in the 1930’s, Sant Ambroeus serves authentic Italian fare for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

The Morningside Heights chef tandem at Rack & Soul (pitmaster John Wheeler and soul-food front man Charles Gabriel) hit the spot with a killer one-two punch: barbecue and fried chicken. Honestly, it’s a coin flip between the two.

When you want a meal consisting of comfort food like mom used to cook, head over to the Kitchenette Uptown in Morningside Heights. The diner has a cottage feel, with pink polka dot wainscoting, a black and white tiled floor, and tables made with salvaged doors.

DessertTruck, the popular West Village confectionary on wheels dreamed up by a former Le Cirque pastry chef and his Columbia Business School roommate, serves unique dessert combinations all hours of the night from a postal truck retrofitted with a gourmet pastry kitchen.


Short for Righteous Urban Barbeque, RUB is helmed by legendary Kansas City pit master Paul Clark, who grills up tender meat dishes like beef brisket, bacon chunks, and burnt ends at his Chelsea restaurant, and serves them by the pound in metal pie plates and Styrofoam cups.

Step beneath Balthazar's red awnings and into the high-ceiling dining room to be welcomed by striking pillars, black on the bottom and textured yellow on the top, with illuminated stained-glass panels in the middle.