New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

Sitting down in the ultra-swank Kittichai on the ground floor of 60 Thompson Hotel in SoHo, you might get the impression that the restaurant itself is flirting with you.

Thirty-five years ago, Eileen Weinberg opened a take-out eatery under an arcade on the western edge of the Broadway Theatre District, where she offered home-style comfort food at a gourmet level and used only the freshest ingredients.

From restaurateur Jack Lamb comes this tiny, 16-seat restaurant in the East Village. At Degustation, chef Wesley Genovart, who previously worked at Perry St, is the center of attention since all seats at the U-shaped counter face the open kitchen.

Trendy trattoria. Originally a horse stable, this restaurant's downstairs lounge, Level V, was more recently a bondage-themed nightclub.

Home to the largest rooftop bar in the city, 230 Fifth is known for its panoramic views of the Manhattan skyline.

The relaunch in 2010, following a 15-month hiatus, aims to make the Palm Court more friendly and modern, dropping the jacket requirement and silencing the live harp.

At this West Village eatery, Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich successfully recreate a traditional Roman osteria (a casual eatery serving wine and simple fare).

There’s a hippy, trippy kind of rough-hewn beauty to this Williamsburg outpost from Taavo Somer (Freemans, Peels). Exposed beams and brick everywhere and cut firewood piled high in triangular pods against one wall.

Bombay Talkie, in Chelsea, focuses on two delights from Indian culture: street food and Bollywood. The clean lines of teak wood and black leather and the gallery-style white walls allow for a great display of Bollywood-inspired canvases; one huge mural shows an Indian street dance scene.

After going through an ownership change in 2010, Won Jo became New Won Jo and with the new name came a kitchen overhaul, a new venting system for the Korean grills, and a revitalized menu.

Despite its nondescript façade and modest interior—furnished with tile floors, small tables, and colorful paintings—this casual midtown eatery is a local go-to for authentic Turkish cuisine.

Scarpetta, housed in an unassuming Greek Revival townhome in the Meatpacking District, made its award-winning debut in 2008, following Scott Conant's successful turns at L'Impero and Alto 18+ and cementing his status as one of Manhattan's New York's foremost I

It's unclear what is the greater attraction at Schiller's Liquor Bar in the lower East Side: the food, the innovative cocktails, or the people-watching.