New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

From the location to the decor to the food, Jean-Georges in the Upper West Side is all about sophistication.

Donatella Arpaia and Michael Psilakis of New York’s perennially packed Kefi restaurant are behind this informal Italian kitchen. Not to be missed—Psilakis’s signature gnudi with crispy prosciutto and truffle butter.

Situated in the lobby of the Alex Hotel in Midtown, Riingo is a fusion of Asian and American cuisine and decor. Red walls, like Japanese lacquer, give accent to the white floors and ebony wood tables and chairs.

 

Anthos closed for business in August 2010.

Founded by the husband and wife team of Emiliano Coppa and Anna Klinger (the two actually met while she was traveling abroad in Italy), this small trattoria was one of the original restaurants that helped Brooklyn emerge as a dining destination.

Walk through Clinton Street Baking Co.

The Scene: One of the early dining clubs on the NYC scene, this five-year-old self-proclaimed “culinary speakeasy” is still smoking—thanks in large part to its warm and talented hosts: southerners Becky (from Florida) and Hayden (from North Carolina).

This inviting Chelsea eatery, owned by Marc Meyer, Chris Paraskevaides, and Vicki Freeman, serves a menu of American- and Mediterranean-influenced comfort food. The dishes are reflective of chef Meyer’s appreciation of sustainable ingredients, local produce, and humanely-raised meats.

Born in Bangkok, chef Pam Panyasiri now brings the flavors of her homeland to Hell’s Kitchen at this no-frills, cash-only café.

Located in Morningside Heights, the Hungarian Pastry Shop is an assuming place often filled with students from nearby Columbia University indulging in coffee, tea and Hungarian baked goods. The long glass pastry counter is filled with cakes, tortes, mousses and more.

Tucked inside the iconic Plaza Hotel, Vienna’s legendary tea, coffee, and candy emporium has a classic selection of desserts like Sacher torte and Wiener Apfelstrudel studded with walnuts.

Opened in 2001 in New York City's Upper West Side, Ouest Restaurant serves up Nouveau American cuisine. Inside the well-lit dining room, red-and-white-striped pendant lamps hang from the vaulted ceiling, and circular red leather booths create an intimate experience.

Installed in a small, sunny storefront in East Harlem, Il Caffe Latte is a tidy, red-brick neighborhood café serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner.