New York City

Restaurants in New York City

Part French brasserie and part American tavern, chef Daniel Boulud’s DBGB Kitchen and Bar (one of five Boulud-owned New York restaurants) is a lively, industrial-style eatery designed with polished cement floors, dark custom furniture, and a partially open kitchen.

Housed in a former storefront church in Red Hook, this renowned bakery is the brainchild of Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito, two veterans of the advertising industry.

Aureole is an upscale New York Theater District restaurant in the Bank of America Tower. It's the flagship for restaurant entrepreneur Charlie Palmer, who supports the farm-to-table food movement and specializes in Progressive American cuisine.

This crisp yet casual offshoot of the Milanese-inspired café serves pastries and breads to accompany your morning macchiato or americano (lighter fare like oatmeal with berries and brown sugar or granola-topped yogurt parfaits are also available).

From homemade Belgian waffles to 30-plus Belgian beers—many of which are used to prepare authentic dishes—this Chelsea brasserie serves the best of Belgium’s traditional fare.

Ronnybook Farms of Columbia County is fast becoming an NYC institution. Chelsea Market plays host to

Hard as it may be for homesick Catalonians or proud Basques to admit it, the best Spanish restaurant in town is run by a guy from Vermont named Seamus.

Passing by this hole in the wall restaurant on Mosco Street in Chinatown, there are few exterior attributes to catch the eye. It’s tiny, with just a few shoddy stools at the counter, chipped walls, and service slightly worse than Seinfeld’s famous soup Nazi.

Now in its third home in Midtown, this nationally acclaimed restaurant was first established by Sirio Maccioni in 1974. Designed by Adam Tihany, the dining room subtly evokes the restaurant’s circus theme with a huge “big top” light fixture and a collection of porcelain monkeys.

Trendy trattoria. Originally a horse stable, this restaurant's downstairs lounge, Level V, was more recently a bondage-themed nightclub.

Gabrielle Hamilton's gutsy food at her hole-in-the-wall café on the Lower East Side is inspired by classic American dishes. Don't miss the "Dutch Style" jumbo blueberry pancake baked in the oven—it's paired with Canadian bacon, sour cream and powdered sugar.

A favorite on the Upper East Side (due mostly to the lack of Vietnamese options), Vermicelli offers the standard fare and take out service like most restaurants of its kind; however, it differs in that it creates a more upscale dining experience with worn wood floors, clothed tables, and maroon v

Fanelli Café on Prince Street has been a SoHo tradition since 1847—a cozy corner spot with a simple, black street-level facade and English ivy vines that reach up to red brick walls of the floors above.