New York City

Restaurants in New York City

Seasonal drink specialists

Telepan is an Upper West Side restaurant with an earth-friendly theme and a menu that changes with the seasons. Produce is locally sourced, and meats, including the ribeye-for-two, are free-range.

Even those not in the neighborhood don't mind the trek over to the East Village for the ultra-thin crust of Gruppo’s pies. A simple red awning with the restaurant’s name beckons those off Ave. B into the low-lit dining room with exposed brick walls and wooden tables, typical of a pizzeria.

Housed on the main floor of a trendy Meatpacking District boutique hotel (also called the Standard) and under the High Line elevated public park, the Standard Grill offers New American cuisine by chef Dan Silverman, with signature dishes like charred octopus and marinated cobia.

The lack of space, or chairs, allows you to focus on the perfect cup of coffee at Abraco's Espresso Bar in the East Village. In the tiny but cheerful bar, famous barista and co-owner Jamie McCormick grinds and brews each cup of coffee to order.

EN Japanese Brasserie in the West Village offers izakaya dining in a setting explicitly crafted to evoke the Tokyo experience. Lofty ceilings and large windows give way to intricate wood carvings, floral centerpieces, and block-printed fabrics.

Packed since the day it was launched in December 2007 by a trio of Bouley veterans, Bar Blanc exudes a grown-up glamour and self-assurance rarely seen in this era of slacker neighborhood joints.

With a history going back to 1954, Second Avenue Deli in Murray Hill is a trademark New York restaurant serving up traditional, kosher Jewish cooking.

“Gem” is the most common word spoken by New Yorkers when discussing Heather and Scott Fratangelo’s unassuming restaurant in the Upper East Side. Serving authentic, heartfelt Italian and Mediterranean fare, Spigolo avoids all pretention in both décor and cuisine.

This New York steakhouse is devoid of the traditional steakhouse décor (pictures of cows, cleavers, etc.) but still delivers what is expected of such an eatery: tender, flavorful steaks.

This husband-and-wife-owned, Brooklyn-based pizzeria and restaurant is as much a lesson in simplistic food preparations as it is in environmental responsibility.

Opened by Venezuelan native Luis “Lucho” Quintero in 2004, El Cocotero offers guests fresh, authentic Venezuelan cuisine. Start your meal with a tropical juice like parchita or guanabana, and then enjoy some sweet plantains with orange glazed baked chicken and asado negro.