New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

Art Deco-designed Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron District offers a unique method of ordering food. Customers choose four principal ingredients from a list of 16 and then share their thoughts and preferences regarding the meal.

Elegant French bistro

Owned by Juilliard-scholar and opera-tenor Tommaso Verdillo, this family-friendly Italian restaurant is located in Bath Beach. The interior is marked by a large-scale, Renaissance-style wall painting of an outdoor-dining scene, which hangs above white linen-covered tables and high-backed, black-m

Even from the exterior, it’s obvious that Pop Burger is no ordinary burger joint.

"For a taste of after-dark Tokyo-style eating in New York, I often find myself at Hagi. Not only is it hidden down a set of stairs just off Times Square (and a couple of blocks from my restaurant Insieme) but it's also crowded with Japanese diners, which is always a good sign.

Iron Chef Bobby Flay brings his adventurous style of American nouveau cuisine to Bar Americain, located in midtown west.

In the heart of NYC’s Greenwich Village sits this neighborhood favorite. Established in 1977, Knickerbocker Bar & Grill features wood-paneled walls filled with memorabilia like original caricatures by Al Hirschfield and copies of the Saturday Evening Post.

Jonathan Benno, the former chef de cuisine at the Michelin three-starred Per Se opened Lincoln in 2010. Housed in a glass-encased space designed by architects Diller Scofidio & Renfro, the restaurant is amping up the appeal of the world's largest performing-arts complex.

Rolf Babiel opened the Midtown Hallo Berlin food cart in 1981 (the first of its kind in New York) and soon after, it became affectionately and widely known as as New York's "wurst pushcart." Start with the Freakin' Deal: one wurst and one Bavarian meatball sandwich on a crusty roll, with

Boulud brings his bistro classics to New York's Lincoln Center neighborhood.

Sushi Seki is a comfortable, no-frills restaurant in the upper East Side, with green-tea colored walls and a plain wooden sushi bar. In lieu of a dazzlying atmosphere, the focus is on some of the most loved Japanese food in the city.

Originally opened in 1908, "the Grotta" is an institution in New York City’s Little Italy.