New York City

Restaurants in New York City

For customers leaving this restaurant located in the Meatpacking District, it may be the décor and layout that sticks in the mind instead of the food: No matter how delicious the dishes may be, it’s hard to compete with the charm of three-level, 1848 brownstone town house.

Styling itself as the "home of Cuban cuisine" in New York, Margon is a neighborhood favorite for its authentic fare and unpretentious atmosphere.

All sleek seamless perfection, the creamy space that once housed Montrachet is a new labor of love for canny restaurateur Drew Nieporent and British wunderkind chef Paul Liebrandt.

Cozy Mexican cantina in the Meatpacking District

Artie's Delicatessen, on the Upper West Side, is a New York-style deli that serves the flavors of 1930s homestyle Jewish cooking within a modern restaurant painted brightly and playing hip music.

Opened in 1913, tucked in the vaulted subterranean chambers of Grand Central Station, the Oyster Bar serves two million bivalves a year.

Zak Pelaccio is a shaggy, pork-loving genius whose food takes elements of laid-back locavorism, the slow-smoke traditions of southern BBQ, and the sweet, spicy, fermented goodness of Southeast Asia and cobbles together a witty, funky, and yes, deliciously fatty style all his own.

Cuban and Mexican prove a wining combination at this lively little Nolita café. The ambience starts with bright blue exterior and extends indoors with colorful tiles and a stainless steel counter, resulting in a kind of cross-cultural diner effect.

Critics had their doubts that New Yorkers would go for a kaiseki restaurant, a highly ritualized form of traditional Japanese cuisine rooted in ancient Kyoto monasteries.

If this restaurant had an official slogan, it might be “come for the view, stay for the food.” Located on the 35th floor of the Time Warner Center in the Mandarin Oriental Hotel, Asiate presents a stunning view of Columbus Circle and Central Park through floor-to-ceiling windows.

Chef Kurt Gutenbrunner endeavors to make the dining experience at his Café Sabarsky, located within the Neue Gallerie, as authentically Viennese as possible.

Named after a variety of small, green olives, Picholine is the first restaurant owned by famed chef Terrance Brennan, who formerly served as a saucier at the renowned Le Cirque restaurant.

This intimate and super-casual restaurant near the Williamsburg Bridge serves only one or two varieties a night, but the oysters are exceptionally fresh, always well-chosen (usually East Coast), and impeccably shucked.