New York City

Restaurants in New York City

New York’s status as a melting pot of diverse cultures makes its dining some of the best and most eclectic in the world, merging international cuisines into high and low food offerings guaranteed to satisfy all taste. There are a few things synonymous with New York City restaurants and dining: fat, doughy bagels, hot dogs and pretzels bought from roving food cards, giant slices of pizza with every conceivable toppings, creamy cheesecakes. But restaurants in New York City have moved far beyond these iconic foods, and many celebrity chefs cut their teeth on the Big Apple’s dining scene, reinventing classic dishes and bringing new ones to the scene with contemporary flair.

There’s a restaurant, and a perfect meal, for all palates: you can slurp ramen at Momofuku, feast on smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal-inspired poutine at Mile End Deli, order authentic (and affordable) Chinese food at Xi’an Famous Foods, lap up borscht at the Russian Tea Room, sample the freshest sushi at 15 East, dive into tacos and tapas at La Palapa, or just get a New York slice at the iconic and ubiquitous Ray’s Pizza. The possibilities at New York City restaurants are literally endless. And don’t forget to wash your meals down with a signature cocktail or craft beer at one of New York City’s many wine bars, cocktail lounges, and microbreweries.

Inspired by Julia Child and trained at Le Cirque, renowned chef Michael Lomonaco worked at Windows on the World before opening this traditional steakhouse in the Time Warner Center.

This sleek, wooden East Village noodle bar has the right kind of hype—not the high-gloss, flashy, media type, but the street level, word-of-mouth kind. The reason?

Located inside the historic 1904 building that once housed the Breslin Hotel and is now home to New York’s Ace Hotel, The Breslin was created by chef April Bloomfield of the Spotted Pig fame.

Located in the Four Seasons, the New York branch of celebrity chef Joël Robuchon's L’Atelier serves many of the signature French dishes made famous at the Paris original.

Greenwich Village’s historic Minetta Tavern originally opened in 1937 and was a haunt for such cultural icons as Ernest Hemingway and Ezra Pound. In 2008, the tavern was renovated by restaurateur Keith McNally and his partners Lee Hanson and Riad Nasr, the team behind Balthazar.

Restaurateur David Burke has created a two-faced restaurant spanning the 59th Street side of the iconic Midtown Bloomingdales.

Founded in 1975, Joe’s Pizza is a Greenwich Village mainstay serving what is, arguably, the best pizza in New York City.

A tasting menu for two at superchef Thomas Keller's plushly impersonal 16-table dining room overlooking Columbus Circle will last three hours and set you back a cool 500 clams (and that’s not counting drinks). So why are reservations harder to come by than courtside seats for the Knicks?

In Ye Olde Days there was New York–style pizza. It was available by the floppy, foldable, roof-of-your-mouth-scalding slice on every corner from the Bronx to the Bowery, a fixture of city life as common as yellow taxis.

Taunt curtains that are gathered in the middle line the windows of Primola, a neighborhood Italian restaurant in the Upper East Side.

What It’s Like: As classic as a string of pearls, this New York jewel—in a perfect setting on the East River under the Brooklyn Bridge—has romanced diners since it opened its doors in 1977.

A small red car with the restaurant’s insignia located on the side is kept parked like a beacon in front of this French bistro.