New York City

Restaurants in New York City

Distilled is a master at elevating casual pub food. Start with the free popcorn, then move on to gochujang-spiced wings, brussels sprouts with fish sauce, and the famous country fried duck and waffle.

This acclaimed tasting-menu spot has a new chef, Ronny Emborg. You'll need a reservation at this 18-seat restaurant, but if Emborg can live up to the precedent set by former chef Matthew Lightner, this is one innovative meal you won't want to miss.

This acclaimed tasting-menu spot has a new chef, Ronny Emborg. You'll need a reservation at this 18-seat restaurant, but if Emborg can live up to the precedent set by former chef Matthew Lightner, this is one innovative meal you won't want to miss.

Chef Soulayphet Schwader brings highly underrated Laotian cuisine to Tribeca with Khe-Yo. The restaurant's version of pre-meal bread and butter is an insanely good jasmine rice—eat it with your hands—served with a spicy bang bang dip.

The Iron Chef's restaurant has been open since 2008, but it still remains a local favorite for its bold flavors. Don't miss Forgione's take on classics like roast chicken under a brick and his 10-minute cookie for dessert.

This Tribeca coffee shop is always buzzing, and not just because of the great coffee served by the friendly baristas.

More than anything, The Frying Pan is known for its eccentric decor: the must-see dinner and drink spot is actually located on a permanently docked boat. Built in 1929, the boat was a United States Lightship in its prime. Today, diners can enjoy a mix of American fare and seafood.

The menu at this seasonally driven gastropub may change regularly, but it consistently pleases.

Go early to this maddeningly popular spot, which fills up with hipsters and the occasional celebrity (Madonna has been spotted here), or brave the wait, which is worth it.

Oddfellows offers 12 rotating flavors of ice cream and sorbet, classically composed banana splits, sundaes and floats, and new innovations like the Cotton Candy Cone and our Ice Cream Sandwich.

If the fact that they have a pizza named after Martha Stewart (aptly called the "Martha") doesn't convince you, the open-space pizza oven will. The space is entirely cozy with its wooden decor and filmanet bulb lighting fixtures.

Bottino does it all, but the sandwiches are their secret weapon. For lunch, you don't want to miss the Sopressata & Fontina with Roasted Peppers, Dijon, and Lettuce ($8.25).

You’ll sometimes spot a boldface name, sans entourage, sipping cappuccino and tucking into a plate of haloumi eggs at this sunny, busy Moroccan café that has been a magnet for artists, musicians, and writers since it opened in 1983.