New York City

Hotels in New York City

This chic, glass-walled hotel abuts Williamsburg’s popular McCarren Park.

In a former factory by the waterfront of Willamsburg’s north side, this boutique property is hot as much for its 70 rooms as it is for its always-packed rooftop bar, The Ides, and it’s main floor restaurant, Reynard.

 mar 17Stylish and compact, this former members-only club is a well-designed secret among midtown hotels. The 65 smallish rooms have combed-plaster walls, chocolate-marble showers, and Honduran mahogany accents; TV's placed behind two-way mirrors are clever space-savers.

Who would stock a Manhattan mini-bar with a harmonica and furnish a bathroom with denim bathrobes?

People are still buzzing about the “new Brooklyn,” where each artisan establishment seems to out-craft the next. And the Wythe—near the Williamsburg riverfront—has become the crown jewel of the borough’s renaissance.

Taking its cue from the Ikea school of cheap chic, this youth-oriented urban hotel isn't for everyone. But its 347 tiny, clean, cleverly designed rooms—very mod, with stainless-steel sinks and Eames-inspired desk chairs—are a blessing for anyone visiting New York on a budget.

Instantly recognizable by the large red “WJ” marking the front entrance, the six-story Washington Jefferson Hotel is located within a 10-minute walk of Times Square, Central Park, and the theatre district.

Once a 1930s hangout for the likes of Fred Astaire, Irving Berlin, and John Barrymore, the Lambs Club, originally designed by Beaux-Arts architect Stanford White, has been reinvented as the new 83-room Chatwal.

The 201-room Tribeca Grand is significantly smaller than its SoHo sister property, but you wouldn't know it from the hotel's soaring atrium, eight stories tall and naturally illuminated thanks to translucent skylights.

Set at the southern tip of Manhattan, this Ritz Carlton may be the only hotel in the city where you'll wake to the morning cries of seagulls.

While the Jane, designed by Sean MacPherson (the Bowery Hotel, the Maritime Hotel), is romantic in theory—an old riverfront building with tiny rooms modeled after European train sleeper cars—keep in mind that a New York hotel with starting rates in the double digits comes with drawbacks.

The hotel also rents out apartments that run from $3,500 to $12,000 per month.

Situated on the Upper East Side, this landmark hotel combines a 1920’s façade with a contemporary interior by renowned French designer Jacques Grange. Zebra-striped floors make a bold statement in the lobby, which also contains orange-velvet sofas and a low-hanging spiral light fixture.