New York City

Things to do in New York City

It’s impossible to take in everything New York City has to offer in a single trip, so when you’re traveling to the Big Apple, it’s wise to plan out an itinerary in advance. Want to sample all the best restaurants NYC has to offer? You can easily map your way from restaurant to restaurant, visiting all of New York’s trendiest eateries. Looking to spend some serious cash on designer duds? Hit the boutiques in SoHo and along Fifth Avenue, stopping only to ransack the racks at Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s. Hoping for the classic tourist experience? Visit the bright lights of Times Square, and make your way to Rockefeller Center, the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, and Central Park. You’ll never run out of things to do in New York City.

Arts and culture lovers should plan to visit New York’s many museums, including the Met, MoMA, and the Museum of Natural History – and cap it off with a visit to Chelsea, where you can peek into smaller galleries and artist’s studios. Sports fans looking for things to do in New York City shouldn’t miss a chance to watch the Yankees play at Yankee stadium, and grab a drink with like-minded fans in a Midtown sports bar. Partiers who visit New York City can take advantage of the city’s booming nightlife in trendy neighborhoods like the Meatpacking District, Greenwich Village, and Williamsburg, in Brooklyn. By the time you’ve worked your way through a fraction of what the Big Apple has to offer, you’ll be exhausted – but you’ll never want to leave.

One of the oldest toy stores in the city, Mary Arnold was established in 1931 and continues to offer a great alternative to the bustling mega toy stores.

Housed inside a renovated horse stable in Tribeca, Smith & Mills is an urban bar with a vintage, industrial feel.

As the city’s first eco-friendly nightclub, Greenhouse offers a “green” place for Manhattan partiers to dance the night away. The venue has water- and energy-efficient features such as LED light bulbs that use one-thirtieth of the energy burned by regular incandescent bulbs.

Considered one of America’s 25 best cocktail bars by GQ magazine, this south Brooklyn watering hole blends multiple centuries with its exposed brick walls, 19th-century mahogany bar, tin-paneled ceiling, and artisan sour, daisy, punch, flip, and royale recipes going back to the 15th century.

This bowling alley on the border of Williamsburg and Greenpoint opened less than a decade ago, but it manages to transport bowlers to the Midwest in the 1970’s, with its nostalgic décor and old-school scoring machines.

Billed as a bespoke travel designer, Lisa Lindblad specializes in adventure and luxury travel to destinations ranging from Morocco and Uruguay to Norway and Sri Lanka. With a background in cultural anthropology, Lindblad is known for blending the expected with the undiscovered.

One of the world's great museums, this Gothic Revival labyrinth tries to be all things to all art lovers—and with its expansion over the past two decades it often succeeds. The museum's breadth makes it dauntingly huge; grab a map and decide to focus on one wing at a time.

New York’s Eataly—a vast emporium dedicated to all things Italian and delicious—gathers a transatlantic all-star team of pizzaioli, gelato-makers, brewers, bakers, wine experts, pasta artisans, and celebrity chef, Mario Batali.

Italy’s vast mosaic of grape varieties and winemaking styles have long been the inspiration behind Vino, which opened in 2000 after the success of jointly owned restaurant I Trulli across the street.

The housewares here range from kitschy items like Piet Houtenbos's infamous grenade lamp to diminutive, high-concept products from other esteemed designers.

A nondescript brown door leads to the speakeasy-style cocktail lounge, Little Branch, in the West Village. The glow from candles softly light the warm-colored walls and tin-wrapped bar, adding to the hushed atmosphere. Even the live jazz coming from the upright piano is on-beat with the scene.

The 52nd Street Project was founded by actor/playwright Willie Reale in 1981 with the aim of improving the lives of the children living in New York City’s Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood.

This Coney Island fruit shop carries the gamut of fruit-based creations, from platters and baskets to chocolate-dipped fruits. Daniel Spitz started the shop in 1957, and his son Mitchell now runs the place (although Daniel continues to keep a close eye on operations).