New York City

Things to do in New York City

It’s impossible to take in everything New York City has to offer in a single trip, so when you’re traveling to the Big Apple, it’s wise to plan out an itinerary in advance. Want to sample all the best restaurants NYC has to offer? You can easily map your way from restaurant to restaurant, visiting all of New York’s trendiest eateries. Looking to spend some serious cash on designer duds? Hit the boutiques in SoHo and along Fifth Avenue, stopping only to ransack the racks at Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s. Hoping for the classic tourist experience? Visit the bright lights of Times Square, and make your way to Rockefeller Center, the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, and Central Park. You’ll never run out of things to do in New York City.

Arts and culture lovers should plan to visit New York’s many museums, including the Met, MoMA, and the Museum of Natural History – and cap it off with a visit to Chelsea, where you can peek into smaller galleries and artist’s studios. Sports fans looking for things to do in New York City shouldn’t miss a chance to watch the Yankees play at Yankee stadium, and grab a drink with like-minded fans in a Midtown sports bar. Partiers who visit New York City can take advantage of the city’s booming nightlife in trendy neighborhoods like the Meatpacking District, Greenwich Village, and Williamsburg, in Brooklyn. By the time you’ve worked your way through a fraction of what the Big Apple has to offer, you’ll be exhausted – but you’ll never want to leave.

Situated in midtown Manhattan, this 35,000-square-foot health club is home to one of the city’s finest pools.

In Italian, “belvedere” means beautiful view, which is indeed what the balconies of this 19th-century fairytale-style castle in the middle of Central Park offer visitors.

...hop on the L subway line to Williamsburg, Brooklyn, for a free tour of the Brooklyn Brewery and its vats of microbrews.

Manhattan’s Antiques Garage, adored by legions of New York collectors, was slated for demolition but has been saved from the wrecking ball—at least for the foreseeable future. This bi-level concrete parking lot is a survivor from the days when the neighborhood was full of antiques venues.

SEW

The name of Scott Evan Wasserberger, whose initials spell SEW, says exactly what he does at his small custom men's clothing store, designing suits for clients like Tony Sirico (of The Sopranos, naturally) using refined Dormeuil, Loro Piana, and Thomas Mason fabrics.

Insider clout: A birthday get-together in Florence included a dinner set around Michelangelo’s David and a private viewing at the Uffizi. Years as agent: 13.

This aptly named wine shop specializes in Burgundies from both well-known and obscure regions, including Chablis, Pommard, and Chassagne-Montrachet. The handpicked inventory also includes a number of Rhône wines, as well as a few from California and Oregon.

An airy showcase for top fashion names such as Dries van Noten and Rick Owens. The shoe selection alone (Henry Beguelin, Ann Demeulemeester) inspires many a pilgrimage from Manhattan.

Husband and wife team Dikko Faust and Esther Smith explore the art of printing in their TriBeCa store Purgatory Pie Press.

Grom is an Italian gelateria devoted to making the best artisanal gelato through the use of top-quality ingredients sourced from around the world. In 2007, New York became the first city with a Grom shop outside of Italy and now has three locations, including one on the Upper West Side.

Named after the sycamore trees in Ditmas Park, this hybrid storefront houses several operations. Guests must first enter through the snug daytime flower shop with tiled floors and chalkboards displaying prices. The dimly lit wooden-interior bar is next.

An outpost of the Chicago original, this SoHo shop specializes in haut chocolat, including bars and truffles made with such unusual ingredients as star anise, sweet curry powder, Jamaican beer, and wasabi.

Located in the Meatpacking District, Ajna (nee Buddha) Bar serves cocktails, appetizers, entrees, and sushi in an opium den-like setting, complete with red chandeliers, cloth couches, and a bamboo tunnel decorated with Buddha statuettes. The walls feature gold murals and Chinese calligraphy.

An undulating, 73-foot-long wall of more than 3,500 wine bottles—displayed horizontally and illuminated from behind—serves as the focal point of this celebrated midtown wine shop.