New York City

Things to do in New York City

It’s impossible to take in everything New York City has to offer in a single trip, so when you’re traveling to the Big Apple, it’s wise to plan out an itinerary in advance. Want to sample all the best restaurants NYC has to offer? You can easily map your way from restaurant to restaurant, visiting all of New York’s trendiest eateries. Looking to spend some serious cash on designer duds? Hit the boutiques in SoHo and along Fifth Avenue, stopping only to ransack the racks at Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s. Hoping for the classic tourist experience? Visit the bright lights of Times Square, and make your way to Rockefeller Center, the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, and Central Park. You’ll never run out of things to do in New York City.

Arts and culture lovers should plan to visit New York’s many museums, including the Met, MoMA, and the Museum of Natural History – and cap it off with a visit to Chelsea, where you can peek into smaller galleries and artist’s studios. Sports fans looking for things to do in New York City shouldn’t miss a chance to watch the Yankees play at Yankee stadium, and grab a drink with like-minded fans in a Midtown sports bar. Partiers who visit New York City can take advantage of the city’s booming nightlife in trendy neighborhoods like the Meatpacking District, Greenwich Village, and Williamsburg, in Brooklyn. By the time you’ve worked your way through a fraction of what the Big Apple has to offer, you’ll be exhausted – but you’ll never want to leave.

Stamped copper ceilings, Italian marble floors, and stained-glass windows evoke an old world-style Italian ambiance at Veniero's Italian Bakery.

The biannual Pier Antiques Show is a treasure trove for collectors, decorators, and designers. The show, held at Pier 94, attracts locals and celebrities with its extensive collection of antiques, including furniture and ceramics, from more than 500 vendors.

Located at the northern end of the Lincoln Center Plaza in Manhattan, the Avery Fisher Hall is a performance venue hosting various musical events throughout the year. The gold-colored auditorium features a “shoebox” design with seating for around 2,700 people.

Touted as a modern-day speakeasy, Blue Owl is housed inside a basement on Second Avenue in New York City. The bar is composed of two small rooms, and the space is highlighted by exposed walls, plush banquettes, and pressed tin-accented tables.

No categories, no competition—the focus is on the films at the New York Film Festival, hosted at the Lincoln Center.

Installed in Tribeca's Greenwich Hotel, this Eastern-inspired spa sports soothing green, wood, and bamboo design elements. The spa's swimming pool and poolside lounge occupy unique space—a reconstructed 250-year-old wood and bamboo farmhouse.

This chandelier-draped, Moulin Rouge-esque destination—a multihyphenated performance space-cum-cocktail lounge-cum-celebrity hangout-cum-restaurant—opened in late 2006.

The New York outpost of renowned French spa Guerlain is located inside the famous Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. Treatment rooms are decorated in soothing neutrals and feature large windows, providing views of the city below.

Inside a restored townhouse, this 6,000-square-foot spa and lounge created by Jamie Ahn (she also founded Acqua Beauty Bar) offers a complete selection of spa services.

Newly opened Citi Field features a granite, brick, and limestone façade plus a sunlit rotunda honoring Brooklyn slugger Jackie Robinson. A trio of top Manhattan restaurateurs is catering to the Amazin’ faithful.

A fashionista's dream (or just a cool stop-in), this avant-garde Chinatown boutique offers pricy goods all majoring in originality. The sparsely filled space, with white walls and clothing racks made of disused pipes, feels more like a gallery than a store of one-of-a-kind finds.

Years as agent: 27. Specialties: India, Sri Lanka, Small luxury cruises. Consulting fee: $500.

A stroll along this span is an only-in-New York experience that provides an up-close sense of the city's true grandeur. It's hardly the world-record-setting suspension bridge it was when finished in 1883, but it has retained an iconic status.

Overlooking a bend of the Harlem River in Upper Manhattan’s Inwood area, Swindler Cove Park is a relatively new five-acre park. Once an illegal dumping site, the area was cleaned up and opened to the public in 2003.

Quality over quantity is the ruling principle at this diminutive wine shop, opened in late 2005 by husband-and-wife team Steve Flynn and Shelly McClure.