New York City

Things to do in New York City

It’s impossible to take in everything New York City has to offer in a single trip, so when you’re traveling to the Big Apple, it’s wise to plan out an itinerary in advance. Want to sample all the best restaurants NYC has to offer? You can easily map your way from restaurant to restaurant, visiting all of New York’s trendiest eateries. Looking to spend some serious cash on designer duds? Hit the boutiques in SoHo and along Fifth Avenue, stopping only to ransack the racks at Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s. Hoping for the classic tourist experience? Visit the bright lights of Times Square, and make your way to Rockefeller Center, the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, and Central Park. You’ll never run out of things to do in New York City.

Arts and culture lovers should plan to visit New York’s many museums, including the Met, MoMA, and the Museum of Natural History – and cap it off with a visit to Chelsea, where you can peek into smaller galleries and artist’s studios. Sports fans looking for things to do in New York City shouldn’t miss a chance to watch the Yankees play at Yankee stadium, and grab a drink with like-minded fans in a Midtown sports bar. Partiers who visit New York City can take advantage of the city’s booming nightlife in trendy neighborhoods like the Meatpacking District, Greenwich Village, and Williamsburg, in Brooklyn. By the time you’ve worked your way through a fraction of what the Big Apple has to offer, you’ll be exhausted – but you’ll never want to leave.

However playful its tangerine walls and funky signs, this specialty cheese and meat shop in Carroll Gardens is serious about its search for unique culinary expression, whether it be its ham bar, temperature- and humidity-controlled aging “cave,” or monthly cheese seminars.

Funniest club in the borough?Definitely. This glitzy, schmaltzy, Russian-Georgian supper club hosts a nightly bacchanal replete with dinner, disco balls, drinking (a lot of drinking), and supremely cheesy live music that’s hardly changed since the place opened in 1981.

Hosted at the SushiSamba Restaurant in Greenwich Village, the Sushi and Sake 101 class is a two-hour class teaches students how to select sushi-worthy fresh fish, what tools are necessary for preparing sushi at home, the history and production of sake, and how to pair sake and sushi. During the c

The Spread: Never mind that New York ranks 25th out of 30 cities for farmers' markets in our AFC survey: this market has as much variety as the Big Apple itself.

Founded by Rita Brookoff, who became a proponent of vintage fashion when she began wearing her mother’s 1940’s suit jacket during her high school years, Legacy is a funky boutique on Thompson Street in New York’s Soho that offers shoppers a unique blend of both vintage and modern fashion.

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In Prospect Heights, this cash-only neighborhood bar attracts guests with its cushioned deep couches, a long wooden communal table, and a small outdoor patio in the rear decorated in white Christmas lights.

The Brooklyn Historical Society has informative neighborhood guides.

The natural skin care products and treatments developed by celebrity aesthetician Tracie Martyn are used by many Hollywood actors, among them Kate Winslet, Brad Pitt, Susan Sarandon, and Lauren Graham.

A retro dessert parlor with cookies named after the owner’s relatives, and whoopee pies made of cream cheese and pumpkin cake.

The biannual Pier Antiques Show is a treasure trove for collectors, decorators, and designers. The show, held at Pier 94, attracts locals and celebrities with its extensive collection of antiques, including furniture and ceramics, from more than 500 vendors.

Located at the northern end of the Lincoln Center Plaza in Manhattan, the Avery Fisher Hall is a performance venue hosting various musical events throughout the year. The gold-colored auditorium features a “shoebox” design with seating for around 2,700 people.

Touted as a modern-day speakeasy, Blue Owl is housed inside a basement on Second Avenue in New York City. The bar is composed of two small rooms, and the space is highlighted by exposed walls, plush banquettes, and pressed tin-accented tables.

No categories, no competition—the focus is on the films at the New York Film Festival, hosted at the Lincoln Center.