New Orleans

Restaurants in New Orleans

Brigsten’s restaurant is led by chef/co-owner Frank Brigtsen, who produces spicy, home-style Acadian/Creole dishes in a cozy, century-old cottage in Riverbend.

Husband-and-wife team David and Torre Solazzo converted the boxy St. Tammany Parish court office into a Cal-Italian restaurant in 2002. The walls still retain their original brick, but chandelier lighting and blond-wood accents give the space a softer quality.

It looks innocuous enough—picture windows; green walls cluttered with framed artifacts and photographs; paintings—all askance, and each checked tablecloth adorned with salt and pepper and the ubiquitous and addictive Crystal hot sauce.

Located about an hour outside of New Orleans, La Provence brings the flavors of France to rural Louisiana. Owned by celebrated local chef John Besh, the restaurant evokes the French countryside with its hardwood floors, exposed oak beams, and stucco walls hung with bucolic artwork.

Galatoire's justifiably styles itself as "the grand dame of old-line New Orleans restaurants and has been a signature French Quarter destination for over a century.

Set among trees in the residential Upper Garden District, Atchafalaya is well away from the French Quarter hulabaloo, which kind of makes it a destination restaurant (you'll need a car to get there).

Brass-band jazz and BBQ joint

From the homemade sangria to the vibrant, come-as-you-are atmosphere, Lola's is everything a Spanish joint seated in New Orleans should be.

Serving up Cajun and Southern cuisine, Cochon on Tchoupitoulas Street is owned by James Beard award-winning chefs Donald Link and Stephen Strykewski. The spacious dining area boasts high ceilings, large windows, handmade modern wood-plank chairs and tables, and a bar made of etched steel.

A Mid-City neighborhood favorite, Mandina’s has been a local tradition and run by the same family since 1932. Open daily, this family-friendly eatery on Canal Street serves up both Louisiana and Italian favorites.

This is a local’s hangout first and tourist stop second, despite its close proximity to the convention center. For no-nonsense barbecue, Ugly Dog Saloon excels with a barebones menu: beef brisket, pulled pork, rotisserie chicken, smoked sausage, and burgers. All sandwiches wallop 1/4lb.

The debate over who serves the best po’ boy in New Orleans still rages, but one candidate lies just off the Jefferson Highway in the west end of the city.

Named for the traditional Louisiana hog slaughtering celebration, Boucherie was established by Commander’s Palace and Stella alum Nathanial Zimet. Zimet first brought inventive fine dining to the masses with his purple food truck, Que Crawl, which eventually led to the creation of Boucherie.