New Orleans

Restaurants in New Orleans

The Bywater restaurant doubles as a gallery space for local artists and has a genuine bohemian charm.

Husband and wife chef-owners Slade Rushing and Allison Vines-Rushing combine the cuisines of Mississippi and Louisiana to create contemporary Southern cuisine with French touches at their Central Business District restaurant, MiLa. Fresh, local ingredients are a hallmark in such dishes as sweet t

From special occasions to Sunday brunch, The Grill Room at Windsor Court Hotel is an institution in the Big Easy fine-dining scene. The palatial dining room contains starched white linens, grandiose floral arrangements, leather-backed chairs, and chandeliers.

In the heady mix that is New Orleans, Mimi’s celebrates the Gulf Coast sound and all the smoky, sweaty soul that comes with it.

This 1919 landmark in the Garden District is acclaimed for its seafood gumbo, soft-shell crabs, signature "pan bread," and fresh-shucked Gulf oysters, just $8.50 for a dozen. Casemento's thrives on being exceedingly good at what it does and charging reasonable prices.

Celebrity chef, Susan Spicer's restaurant in Lakeview features an eclectic, globalized menu: a ceviche with fresh tortilla chips and guacamole; Thai shrimp and pork meatballs; pizza from a wood-burning oven; deviled eggs.

A local institution for more than a century, Commander’s Palace was first established in the Garden District in 1880. The authentic Creole restaurant, now owned by the Brennan family, is housed in a white and turquoise Victorian building with striped awnings and gingerbread detailing.

The menu at Café du Monde in the French Market is simple, and almost everyone comes for the same combination: café au lait and beignets. New Orleans-style cafe au lait is made with scalded milk, coffee and ground chicory root, creating a slightly bitter flavor.

Far from the usual tourist circuit, this uptown bistro serves reinvented Creole classics in a no-frills, two-story dining room. Open since 1983, Clancy’s has a loyal following of locals who enjoy the upscale yet still lively atmosphere.

Don’t let the modest, rustic appearance and off-the-beaten-path location of Domilise’s Po-Boy & Bar on Annuciation Street fool you. The food here is well-worth a sidetrack. Once inside you’ll find simple tables and wood-paneled walls, and possibly a line.

Operating under the motto "Anyone can put the heat to the meat, but only a few can barbecue" since 1983, A & R is perhaps the pinnacle of BBQ in Memphis.

Parlez vous francais? Chef Aaron Burgau’s menu at Patois certainly does, but with a strong southern twang. Considering his commitment to locally sourced ingredients, how could it not?

Proof that upscale Creole cuisine can be inventive, (relatively) affordable, and found outside of the French Quarter, Upperline is one of the most acclaimed eateries in the city.