New Orleans

Things to do in New Orleans

After being shut down by Hurricane Katrina, the world’s oldest continuously operating streetcar, the St. Charles, is once again winding over 13.2 miles, from the edge of the French Quarter, through the Garden District, and on to Riverbend—as it has for more than 150 years.

Years as Agent: 18. Specialties: New Orleans, Switzerland. Fee: Varies.

The sister restaurant to Commander’s Palace, this Creole café and cocktail bar is named for the now-deceased bon vivant Adelaide Brennan. Located in the Loews Hotel bordering the arts district, the restaurant is adorned with vibrant contemporary artwork and crystal light fixtures.

Strange Factor: You don’t have to be a fan of Twilight or True Blood to enjoy this creepy two-hour vampire-themed walking tour through NOLA’s most famous historic neighborhood.

Among the New Orleans Museum of Art’s core values are quality, community, diversity, and education—all of which imbue its collection of more than 40,000 objects with the esprit of the region.

Overlooking Royale Street in the famed French Quarter is a legendary circus act: The Hotel Monteleone's Carousel Bar, one of the most famous watering holes in the Big Easy.

Few people leave this dive bar, tucked away in the residential Bywater section of New Orleans, without good stories to share with friends.

Set in a mid-19th-century cottage in uptown, this neighborhood bistro combines upscale Creole cuisine with quirky touches like cocktails served in mason jars.

An eclectic mix of 18th- and 19th-century antiques from around the globe.

This idiosyncratic bar may have lost its iconic jukebox to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, but not any of its packrat personality.

Located in Mid-City, this dive bar offers creative cocktails, $2 Pabst Blue Ribbon, and a variety of entertainment, from air hockey and retro board games to a jukebox and a photo booth. Small and smoky, the interior is adorned with velvet wallpaper and eclectic, mostly risqué, artwork.

An interiors shop owned by Mad Men's Bryan Batt.

It’s not edgy in the slightest, and it hasn’t been trendy since Huey Long was in office. Yet the Columns endures, and thank God for that. This 1883 Italianate mansion, rising among the moss-shrouded oaks on St. Charles Avenue, just happens to be a hotel.