New Mexico

New Mexico Travel Guide

Gather the children to the historic lodge’s on Saturday evenings to catch the Chuckwagon Cowboy Dinner show. Here, Wild West tales are told through guitar music and song as you dig into hearty ranch-hand staples like beef brisket, beans, and corn bread.

The 6,290-foot-high peak is a landmark along the Old Santa Fe Trail.

This National Historic Landmark, in Sky City Pueblo, was made using more than 20,000 tons of earth and stone over the course of a decade (1629-1640).

Take in the works of the native Taos culture at this art outlet.

The spacious rooms here are kitted out with handsome Native American furnishings and surround a courtyard pool.

Blue Canyon Gallery is the first place you reach driving into Magdalena from Socorro—the gallery, a house, and a kiln. In the shop one finds pottery made by owner Barbara Moore, and jewelry made by Indians on the nearby Alamo Navajo Reservation.

Book one of the inexpensive Mission revival–style rooms (furnished with early-20th-century antiques), or splurge on one of the more modern cottages with kitchenettes. Soak in one of the outdoor mineral pools before taking one of the resort’s restorative yoga classes.

Cozy up to a romantic outdoor fire pit at this Santa Fe lounge. Or opt for the wood-paneled rooms with overstuffed chairs and a resident ghost.

Every year serious art buyers and trinket hounds descend on Santa Fe for this weekend-long event, which turns the town into a Native American art-crazed mob scene.

A partially reconstructed circa-1100 pueblo.

Taste the edible (chocolate) religious art sold at this Lilliputian candy shop in an 18th-century courtyard.

During the last weekend of July, more than 250 of New Mexico's most accomplished native artisans exhibit their wares at Spanish Market, one of Santa Fe's two major art gatherings (the other is Indian Market, held about a month later in August