New Mexico

Restaurants in New Mexico

Restaurants in New Mexico offer a delightful range of cuisine choices. Authentic New Mexican cuisine combines Spanish, Native American, Mexican, and Mediterranean fare to create a style that is truly distinct. New Mexico restaurant diners can expect an abundance of hot and fresh Hatch green chiles, the state’s pride and joy.

In Santa Fe, dine at Tomasita’s, one of the best restaurants in New Mexico. The restaurant is located near the New Mexico rail runner train and offers up dishes such as chiles rellenos and New Mexican pinto beans. Don’t forget to order a margarita; the giant cocktails are dangerously boozy. Looking to tame that sweet tooth? The annual Pie Festival in Pie Town, New Mexico takes place the second Saturday of September. Enter your pie in the festival’s pie contest, watch the crowning of the Pie Queen or just enjoy a bite (or two, or three) of the delicious dessert at the Pie Town Cafe. After taking in the beauty of Carlsbad Caverns, grab a cold beer and hearty food at Red Chimney Pit Bar-B-Q. This New Mexico restaurant is sure to satisfy the appetite of any carnivore with its selection of brisket, pork ribs and fried catfish.

Filled with contemporary artwork (for sale) and generally packed to the gills, Pasqual's is one of those restaurants that locals brave only during off-hours.

Easy to overlook in a strip mall on Cerrillos Road, Cafe Castro's is frequented by locals for their simple New Mexican food. The cafe is decorated in the usual Santa Fe style: terra cotta floors, thick vigas, and Mexican art, including Dia De Los Muertos paintings.

Southwestern comfort foods (chiles rellenos; chimichangas) are the specialties at this cheerful, bustling adobe on Bernalillo’s main drag.

Self-taught pastry chef Melinda Gipson opened this treat shop in a handsome little adobe right next to the Georgia O’Keefe Museum.

Since it’s moved from its original location a few times, this café no longer sits in an actual tree. But this downtown hub still offers a delicious, mostly organic menu with surprising gluten-free options like the large breakfast burrito smothered in Chimayo red chile.

Steeped in Ayurvedic tradition, and offering an all-vegetarian menu, Annapurna—a Sanskrit word meaning “complete food”—serves gluten-free veggie dishes, soups, and specials of the day, seven days a week.

Apart from traditionally baked bread and a few salad dressings (just ask which ones have gluten), everything on the menu at this casual farm-to-table eatery is safe for gluten-free diners.

Anyone who believes that breads, cinnamon rolls, scones, muffins, and cupcakes can’t taste good without gluten needs to eat here—they’ll be proved immediately and deliciously wrong.

This beautiful bar north of Santa Fe is a long way to drive for a drink, but the crisp air, open-pit fireplaces, and uninterrupted sunset views are well worth the excursion, especially if you’re on your way to a late night at the Opera.

There’s not a lot of indoor space in this bar, which is a large part of its appeal. When it’s empty you can carry on an interesting conversation with the bartender, who always seems to be a great conversationalist. But when it’s full, this place feels packed.

I love the Agave Lounge precisely because it feels like it doesn’t belong in Santa Fe. With sleek, long leather couches and a fireplace straight out of the Jetsons, this hipster enclave doesn’t have a chile ristra in site.

Whatever secret ingredient the bartender adds to his Agave Way margarita, beyond red grapes, New Mexico green chile, Espolón Reposado tequila, lime juice, and agave nectar, he needs to keep doing it.

What’s not to love about a bar that’s purportedly haunted by the dead wife of the business magnate who once owned this mansion?

Right next to the New Mexico Rail Runner train depot, Tomasita’s is the natural next stop for hungry tourists. That’s a good thing—because the chefs here know how to make New Mexican classics.

It’s tough to stick to the red- or green-chile New Mexico party line at this south-of-town café, because Harry’s eclectic menu includes flavors that stray far from the pepper plant.