New Mexico

Hotels in New Mexico

Just blocks from the Plaza and close to the Opera, the Inn of the Turquoise Bear is surrounded by an acre of terraces, gardens full of lilacs and roses, and tall pines.

Occupying a renovated 1920s hacienda, the B&B-style hotel has hardwood floors, Mission-style furnishings, and convenient access to the adjacent Gila National Forest.

Two historic buildings, designed by renowned New Mexico architect John Gaw Meem, sit under cottonwood trees along the Rio Grande.

With handcrafted southwestern furniture and wood-paneled walls, the reasonably priced Chama Trails Inn feels homier than its simple motel exterior might suggest; it’s also close to the railway depot.

Filled with old-world furnishings (and, reportedly, ghosts), the inn is home to the famed Adobe Bar, a perfect perch for margaritas and people-watching.

Built in 1922, this landmark Santa Fe hotel has wood vigas (beams), kiva fireplaces, and polished tile floors. The rooftop Bell Tower Bar is the place for sunset cocktails with a view of the Jemez Mountains.

Located on six quiet acres just a few blocks from the Plaza, La Posada de Santa Fe Resort is a mix of styles, both old and new: the Victorian mansion (circa 1882) is now the Staab House bar; the 157 hotel rooms take inspiration from Pueblo architecture; the art collection focuses on contemporary

If size matters, look no further than Ted Turner's 591,000-acre Vermejo Park Ranch (it's two-thirds the size of Rhode Island).

Kids enjoy the Wild West vibe of the rollicking hotell, where U.S. Marshal Bob Olinger dined for the last time before Billy the Kid gunned him down. Rooms are clean and basic, with Victorian and southwestern furnishings.

San Antonio’s most stylish digs have a coveted post along Riverwalk, the city’s famed cypress-shrouded waterway. Guest rooms are fitted with posh accoutrements like brown leather headboards and faux-mink throws and feature white Italian marble bathrooms with plantation-style shutters.

Book one of the inexpensive Mission revival–style rooms (furnished with early-20th-century antiques), or splurge on one of the more modern cottages with kitchenettes. Soak in one of the outdoor mineral pools before taking one of the resort’s restorative yoga classes.

Located on the Old Town Plaza in Las Vegas, New Mexico, this three-story Italianate hotel was known as the Belle of the Southwest when it was first built in 1882.

Celebs and other A-listers tend to choose this fashionable boutique hotel, which sits discreetly across the street from the Palace of the Governors.