Nevada

Restaurants in Nevada

Often lauded as the best steakhouse in Las Vegas, this iconic restaurant excels under the direction of award-winning chef and restaurateur Jean-Georges Vongerichten.

Inspired by Tokyo’s Shibuya district, this upscale Japanese restaurant on MGM’s Studio Walk offers inventive cuisine ranging from small plates to fresh sushi, which is often hailed as the best in the city.

Until 2008, Chicago’s Charlie Trotter was one of the few über-chefs to resist Las Vegas. But he finally opened not one, but two spots in the Palazzo Resort. The most prized table at elegant Restaurant Charlie is in the glass-encased nook above the open kitchen.

This property has closed.

Located at a 7,717-foot elevation, the Mount Charleston Lodge is known for its panoramic views of Kyle Canyon's Humboldt Toiyabe National Forest. Large windows line three of the restaurant’s walls, and the 20-foot, loft ceiling mirrors the mountain peaks that encircle the lodge.

Named for celebrated chef and owner Gabino Sotelino, this lovely sidewalk bistro is renowned for its delicious and surprisingly affordable French cuisine.

Located in the MGM Grand, this gourmet sandwich shop from celebrity chef Tom Colicchio is ideal for a quick, affordable bite on the Strip. Here, patrons can either order meals to go or settle into bright green chairs surrounded by large red columns and white tables on blond hardwood floors.

Located along the Extraterrestrial Highway near Area 51, this quirky outpost includes a small motel, bar, and restaurant, all of which cater to alien enthusiasts. From the highway, this landmark appears as a white, corrugated-metal building and an otherworldly UFO saucer in its harness.

Established in 1991, this authentic Italian eatery began as a tiny, 12-seat space and now serves an average of 300 people per day. Located just west of the Strip on Flamingo Road, Nora’s is set in an unassuming strip mall that belies its warmly lit interior with occasional live jazz.

Enter this airy, all-white modern dining room, which opened in 2006, and the only reminder that you are not eating in the Hamptons is the fact that you had to reach Vintner Grill through an office park.