Nevada

Hotels in Nevada

The Venetian, on the Las Vegas Strip, isn’t the only place where Italy is re-created in Nevada’s Mojave Desert. Consider Ravella, a sprawling, 349-room resort on the shores of Lake Las Vegas, just 17 miles east of Sin City.

Secretive, secluded, and luxurious, the Mansion at MGM Grand is modeled after an 18th-century Tuscan villa and is typically reserved for high-rollers and celebrities, remaining largely unknown to the general populous.

After much anticipation, the $300 million Ritz-Carlton Lake Tahoe opened in December 2009 at the family-friendly Northstar at Tahoe resort.

Rising 1,149 feet above the Strip, the Stratosphere Tower is the tallest structure in Las Vegas. Its two observation decks make it especially popular among pint-sized travelers; though parents can’t help but love the views from the revolving Top of the World restaurant (one of six at the hotel).

The first hotel to open in Vegas without a casino (it debuted, somewhat ironically, in a tower adjacent to Mandalay Bay in 1999), the Four Seasons is arguably still the best of this growing breed.

At the 392-room property, interior designer Adam Tihany tries to re-create the experience of contemporary Hong Kong.

Now owned by the Morgans Hotel Group, the Hard Rock today is less grunge and far more rock 'n' roll glam, with an expansion that will include a 35,000-square-foot casino, a 20,000-plus-square-foot spa, and 950 guest rooms.

The newest resort in Steve Wynn's collection is less Las Vegas glam and more luxurious desert oasis. Case in point: the sunny casino has glasswalls that look out onto verdant gardens and pools.

The most painstakingly detailed of the themed casino resorts, the Venetian is a condensed version of its namesake city and features some of the largest suites on the Strip, averaging 700 square feet with sunken living rooms and marble baths.

At the 1,495-room condominium hotel, designed by Rafael Viñoly, there is a ground-floor restaurant called Silk Road, a new venue for chef Martin Heierling, who is known for his imaginative Pan-Asian cuisine.

The MGM Grand, with its commanding location on the Vegas Strip marked by a 100,000-lb bronze lion statue, is a Las Vegas experience in itself.

While this casino offers plenty for gamblers—it houses 1,723 slot machines, 39 table games, and live poker—it’s also home to the Desperado, one of the tallest and fastest roller coasters in the world, as well as a log flume ride that runs through the main casino floor.

Mid-Strip extravaganza with a palatial 65,000-square-foot spa, 14 restaurants, botanical gardens, and dancing fountains.