Nevada

Hotels in Nevada

The Venetian, on the Las Vegas Strip, isn’t the only place where Italy is re-created in Nevada’s Mojave Desert. Consider Ravella, a sprawling, 349-room resort on the shores of Lake Las Vegas, just 17 miles east of Sin City.

Now owned by the Morgans Hotel Group, the Hard Rock today is less grunge and far more rock 'n' roll glam, with an expansion that will include a 35,000-square-foot casino, a 20,000-plus-square-foot spa, and 950 guest rooms.

Topped with colorful turrets rising high above the Strip, this castle-themed resort was the world’s largest hotel when it first opened in 1990.

This all-suite, non-gaming, and non-smoking property is a serene oasis in the midst of the bright lights and bustling activity of Sin City.

If you want to immerse yourself in the glitz and glam of Las Vegas, the Palms Hotel is where you want to be.

Howard Hughes once spent several weeks at the 20-room property. Today, the hotel’s been fully restored to its original 1930s self, and you can channel other famous guests, including Bette Davis, Will Rogers, James Cagney, and Boris Karloff.

The newest resort in Steve Wynn's collection is less Las Vegas glam and more luxurious desert oasis. Case in point: the sunny casino has glasswalls that look out onto verdant gardens and pools.

With its central location on the Strip and its effortless synthesis of boutique coziness with sprawling amenities, Paris is the go-to spot for travelers in Vegas who are looking for a little elegance.

In a town where "classic" is a euphemism for "marked for implosion," Flamingo Las Vegas, which was originally owned by Bugsy Siegel in 1946, has exuberantly remade itself and become the hippest hotel on the Strip.

At the 1,495-room condominium hotel, designed by Rafael Viñoly, there is a ground-floor restaurant called Silk Road, a new venue for chef Martin Heierling, who is known for his imaginative Pan-Asian cuisine.

The most painstakingly detailed of the themed casino resorts, the Venetian is a condensed version of its namesake city and features some of the largest suites on the Strip, averaging 700 square feet with sunken living rooms and marble baths.

LEED-certified all-suite property with over-the-top room décor (multiple flat-screen TV’s, sunken living rooms, and mini-bars stocked with everything from champagne to La Belge Chocolatier desserts).

Forget that it was once considered a destination wedding location for members of some polygamist sects in Utah; visit the hotel for its high mineral-content waters, which fill in-room spa tubs as well as the springs around the property.

Opened in 1966, Caesars was Las Vegas's first foray into over-the-top themed opulence, and the classic bubbling fountains, trompe l'oeil ceilings, and Roman statuary live on in this ever-expanding empire.

The MGM Grand, with its commanding location on the Vegas Strip marked by a 100,000-lb bronze lion statue, is a Las Vegas experience in itself.