The Amalfi Coast

The Amalfi Coast Travel Guide

One of the world’s most popular seaside destinations, the Amalfi Coast offers endless cultural events, especially during the spring and summer. Case in point: From June through September, the Ravello Festival transforms its eponymous town into a stage for film, orchestral concerts, and ballet performances. In September, the Gustaminori festival is dedicated to Italian gastronomy; be sure to sample the homemade pasta. Food lovers should also consider getting their hands dirty by enrolling in cooking classes taught by experts such as Mamma Agata. Other things to do on the Amalfi Coast include chartering a sailboat, exploring centuries-old villas surrounded by delightful gardens (two standouts: Villa Rufolo and Villa Cimbrone), and shopping at boutiques stocked with fine crafts, such as Stinga, in Sorrento). More active types may prefer visiting the Grotta dello Smeraldo; in the grotto, a green light emanates from the water and stalagmites rise up from the sea. However you spend your time, be sure to order a drink made with limoncello, a classic Amalfi Coast liqueur made from lemons. Cheers.

The museum houses ancient artifacts, including the Coppa di Nestore (mentioned in Homer's Iliad), from the ancient Greek settlement of Pithecusae.

The best way to enjoy the precipitous and beautiful Amalfi Drive is to avoid the hair-raising hassle of driving it yourself and instead take the public bus.

The Stinga family have been Sorrento’s masters of wood inlay since 1890. Third-generation brothers Franco and Roberto keep the family tradition alive, meticulously crafting marquetry jewelry boxes, picture frames, and tabletops in styles from classic to strikingly modern.

At the eight-room hotel, made up of two country-style houses, you can take art classes on the lawn.

Sorrento's best address for locally made limoncello (lemon liqueur) is in a purple-and-green-walled store that also sells artisan-made products, like orange-scented olive oil.

Watch Pasquale Sorrentino create everything from lamps to tabletops in a light-filled studio. Look for vases, plates, and mugs with intricate floral designs using Sorrentino's signature blue.

Located on Via Camerelle, the most fashionable shopping street on the island, this upscale clothing store showcases the work of world-renowned design duo Dean and Dan Caten.

The Romanesque cathedral features several examples of Sorrento's traditional craft of intarsio, or inlaid woodwork. There are also marble tombs and some gory saints' relics, several of whose bones lie interred in one of the chapels.

Camper and Nicholsons is a company that specializes in all-things yachting, from the custom building and refitting of yachts, to yacht management services and sales.

Ravello’s cathedral has an impressive pedigree, dating back to 1087, the year after Ravello was granted its own bishopric.

Founded by Vincenzo Pinto in the 1800's, this is the oldest of the handcrafted tile and ceramic art production houses still operating in Vietri sul Mare.

On any given day, this renowned cobbler’s shop along a sloping, stone lane in the village of Positano on the Amalfi Coast stands ready to create custom leather sandals for patrons as it has for nearly 100 years.

The chic island of Capri is no stranger to high-end fashion shops, and this top-shelf clothier holds its own alongside brands like Ermenegildo Zegna, Prada, and Gucci.

The village's most upscale boutique is in a small space opposite Le Sirenuse hotel. Must-buys include colorful leather ballerina shoes by Porselli, swimwear by hot labels Melissa Odabash and Laura Urbinati, and Le Sirenuse's own tangy Eau d'Italie toiletries line.