The Amalfi Coast

The Amalfi Coast Travel Guide

The Amatruda family has been sifting pulp in Amalfi since at least 1483, and theirs is one of the few remaining outfits in town still hand-making the paper that made Amalfi famous in the late Middle Ages.

Part of the 18th-century seaside villa that houses Le Sirenuse hotel, this upscale bar is set on an open-air terrace overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea and the surrounding hills.

At the peaceful piano bar in this 1962 hotel, everything from the floor-tiles to the furniture was designed by Milanese legend Gio Ponti.

Made entirely in Italy, Malo is all about cashmere. This high-end brand was created in 1972 in Florence, and the original offices are still located there.

What began during the difficult post-World War II period as a way for fisherman Salvatore Lucibello to supplement his income is now a lucrative business offering 24-hour water taxi service, boat rentals (with or without captain), and day-long, organized excursions along the Amalfi Coast and Capri

Built for the English lord Ernest William Beckett and riddled with pretty little cloisters and crypts, this 1904 villa isn’t nearly on par with the Rufolo.

The hand-painted floor tiles and ceramic plates decorating the hotels and restaurants along the coast come from the famous workshops of Vietri sul Mare, a suburb of Salerno at the east end of Amalfi Drive.

About two hours south of Rome, chef-owner Berardino Lombardo runs daily cooking classes at his four-room property using ingredients sourced from the hotel’s 100-acre farm, filled with wild chicory, heirloom Annurche apples, and even semi-wild black Casertano pigs.

The recently opened gourmet store stocks everything from blood-orange marmalade and mozzarella to sauces and condiments. Raro also serves light lunches and snacks.

The De Martino brothers bake terra-cotta-colored tiles in a 450-year-old wood oven.

The 18th-century villa on the narrow Via San Nicola houses a museum that highlights even more woodwork. The gift shop sells high-end housewares and furniture by designer Alessandro Fiorentino and his three architect sons.

For a fraying-at-the-edges window into that exalted era of the 19th-century grand tour, pop into Sorrento’s “Foreigner’s Club” bar, home to the town tourist office and still patronized largely by English-speaking tourists for one very good reason: the view.

Tenuta Vannulo is to mozzarella di bufala a bit what Screaming Eagle and Harlan Estate are to Cabernet Sauvignon: artisanal, scarce, legendary. At 8 a.m., people are already queueing at the doors of the bottega for cheese made just two or three hours earlier.

The glowing turquoise waters in the half-submerged Grotta dello Smeraldo, along the coastal road between Praiano and Amalfi, don’t quite compare to the Blue Grotto on nearby Capri, but the blue-green pool does make for a fun diversion along the coast.