The Amalfi Coast

Restaurants in The Amalfi Coast

Octopus, mussels, and all kinds of fish crop up on the menus of most Amalfi Coast restaurants, many of which afford fantastic people watching on cobbled streets or views of the water. More intrepid foodies won’t mind venturing off the beaten track to seek out some of the best restaurants on the Amalfi Coast that lie outside of the more touristed areas. This is the kind of place where you’ll want to have a few gems in your back pocket, but exploring is half the fun. It’s worth noting that quite a few regional white wines are coming into their own, so it’s worth sampling your host’s recommendation along with your meal. Buon appetito.

Reserve a table under the open loggia at Eolo, in Amalfi; the views are spectacular.
Best known for its zuppa di pesce (fish soup), Da Gemma, in Amalfi, has an outdoor terrace that affords prime people watching.
The menu at La Torre in Salerno features traditional Italian fare.
In Positano, Lo Scoglio is a glass pavilion built on top of a wooden jetty with a fountain directly in the center.
At Donna Rosa, a family-owned Amalfi Coast restaurant, the menu changes frequently and reservations are imperative.

The island’s only Michelin-starred restaurant is in the Capri Palace Hotel. Dine on raw red shrimp with asparagus and apple salad followed by cuttlefish-ink ravioli.

In an all-but-hidden alleyway in Anacapri, on the quieter, north side of the island, the Trattoria Il Solitario takes up an outdoor garden in front of a 14th-century bell tower of the Church of Santa Sofia.

Don’t be fooled by the entrance, under a tunnel along the main coastal road: La Caravella has been one of the area’s finest restaurants for nearly 50 years, a required culinary stop since Federico Fellini, Andy Warhol, and Jackie Kennedy put it on the map in the 1960s.

Since it opened in 1868, this neighborhood favorite is on only its third generation of family management, which attests to its unwavering quality—and to the longevity of the locals.

When Sophia Loren visited Sorrento recently, she insisted on eating at this no-frills restaurant, with simple wooden tables and plastic chairs on a portside deck that appears unaltered since the 1950’s.

Located on a cliff in the small village of Montepertuso, this popular restaurant serves traditional, regional dishes with an emphasis on local ingredients.

The colorful osteria on the dirt road that leads to Punta Licosa serves delicious local favorites and organic fresh fish.

Though the seafood is fresh and expertly prepared and the pizzas from the brick oven are quite good, you don’t really come here for the fairly standard cuisine.

Don’t be put off by the touristy effects (English menu; serenading guitar player). Try the tomato-filled ravioli in fish sauce, or the zucchini flowers stuffed with ricotta. But be warned: portions are nouvelle (i.e., small).

Located in the village of Ponteromito and operating since 1908, this restaurant serves traditional, regional dishes. Homemade pasta dishes, like ricotta-stuffed ravioli topped with a walnut and mushroom sauce, are specialties.

On a coast where the dining choices seem divided between pretentious, overpriced temples of haute cuisine and unmemorable restaurants with their pizza ovens aimed squarely at the tourist masses, it’s refreshing to find a holdout like Da Barracca.