The Amalfi Coast

Restaurants in The Amalfi Coast

Octopus, mussels, and all kinds of fish crop up on the menus of most Amalfi Coast restaurants, many of which afford fantastic people watching on cobbled streets or views of the water. More intrepid foodies won’t mind venturing off the beaten track to seek out some of the best restaurants on the Amalfi Coast that lie outside of the more touristed areas. This is the kind of place where you’ll want to have a few gems in your back pocket, but exploring is half the fun. It’s worth noting that quite a few regional white wines are coming into their own, so it’s worth sampling your host’s recommendation along with your meal. Buon appetito.

Reserve a table under the open loggia at Eolo, in Amalfi; the views are spectacular.
Best known for its zuppa di pesce (fish soup), Da Gemma, in Amalfi, has an outdoor terrace that affords prime people watching.
The menu at La Torre in Salerno features traditional Italian fare.
In Positano, Lo Scoglio is a glass pavilion built on top of a wooden jetty with a fountain directly in the center.
At Donna Rosa, a family-owned Amalfi Coast restaurant, the menu changes frequently and reservations are imperative.

Don’t be put off by the touristy effects (English menu; serenading guitar player). Try the tomato-filled ravioli in fish sauce, or the zucchini flowers stuffed with ricotta. But be warned: portions are nouvelle (i.e., small).

Just west of Capri’s central “piazzetta,” Da Giorgio restaurant operates out of the hotel of the same name, serving traditional island fare like linguine with redfish sauce, scialatielli with prawns, and beef fillet in a red wine sauce.

The view: Terrace tables at Rosellinis—in the Palazzo Sasso—look out on the craggy cliffs and coves of the Amalfi Coast, where fishing boats dot the cerulean waters of the Mediterranean 1,000 feet below.

Pasquale Torrente, owner of Al Convento restaurant, describes colatura-making (anchovy oil) with a semi-pagan glee: the fishing under a spring moon, the curing in barrels with chestnuts or lemons.

Located in the village of Ponteromito and operating since 1908, this restaurant serves traditional, regional dishes. Homemade pasta dishes, like ricotta-stuffed ravioli topped with a walnut and mushroom sauce, are specialties.

Located up a winding, stepped alleyway, the pizzeria is easy to miss; patrons often get lost looking it or stumble upon it while looking for something else.

Positano’s most stylish bar and restaurant serves freshly made, regionally sourced dishes—like fried ravioli with ricotta and mozzarella on a bed of fresh tomatoes—in a slick interior with floor cushions and a softly lit courtyard.

On a coast where the dining choices seem divided between pretentious, overpriced temples of haute cuisine and unmemorable restaurants with their pizza ovens aimed squarely at the tourist masses, it’s refreshing to find a holdout like Da Barracca.

Throughout the Campania region of southern Italy, the Fischetti family is famous for their restaurant in Vallesaccarda Avellino, which for three generations has served Irpinian dishes like ricotta ravioli in walnut sauce, fusilli with artichokes and lamb meatballs, and rabbit in spicy tomato sauc

Located in a back street off Piazza Tasso in the center of Sorrento, this restaurant serves traditional Mediterranean and Neapolitan cuisine.