The Amalfi Coast

Restaurants in The Amalfi Coast

Octopus, mussels, and all kinds of fish crop up on the menus of most Amalfi Coast restaurants, many of which afford fantastic people watching on cobbled streets or views of the water. More intrepid foodies won’t mind venturing off the beaten track to seek out some of the best restaurants on the Amalfi Coast that lie outside of the more touristed areas. This is the kind of place where you’ll want to have a few gems in your back pocket, but exploring is half the fun. It’s worth noting that quite a few regional white wines are coming into their own, so it’s worth sampling your host’s recommendation along with your meal. Buon appetito.

Reserve a table under the open loggia at Eolo, in Amalfi; the views are spectacular.
Best known for its zuppa di pesce (fish soup), Da Gemma, in Amalfi, has an outdoor terrace that affords prime people watching.
The menu at La Torre in Salerno features traditional Italian fare.
In Positano, Lo Scoglio is a glass pavilion built on top of a wooden jetty with a fountain directly in the center.
At Donna Rosa, a family-owned Amalfi Coast restaurant, the menu changes frequently and reservations are imperative.

The colorful osteria on the dirt road that leads to Punta Licosa serves delicious local favorites and organic fresh fish.

Though the seafood is fresh and expertly prepared and the pizzas from the brick oven are quite good, you don’t really come here for the fairly standard cuisine.

Don’t be put off by the touristy effects (English menu; serenading guitar player). Try the tomato-filled ravioli in fish sauce, or the zucchini flowers stuffed with ricotta. But be warned: portions are nouvelle (i.e., small).

Located in the village of Ponteromito and operating since 1908, this restaurant serves traditional, regional dishes. Homemade pasta dishes, like ricotta-stuffed ravioli topped with a walnut and mushroom sauce, are specialties.

On a coast where the dining choices seem divided between pretentious, overpriced temples of haute cuisine and unmemorable restaurants with their pizza ovens aimed squarely at the tourist masses, it’s refreshing to find a holdout like Da Barracca.

Campania’s product and restaurant boom owes thanks to Livia and Alfonso Iaccarino, of the Michelin two-starred Don Alfonso 1890 restaurant, in Sant’Agata sui due Golfi, overlooking the Gulf of Naples.

It may be located on the lower level of a ho-hum hotel, but the food that comes out of this diminutive kitchen is anything but.

Eat on the garden terrace, suspended almost a thousand feet above the sea in Castellabate.

It may have slipped a notch or two from its status of celebrity hot spot in the days of Bogie and Jackie O—admittedly it’s now a bit of a tourist trap—but such a relentlessly friendly place is hard to resist.

For a taste of Grand-Tour glamour, stop for lunch at the sea-view restaurant inside the Grand Hotel Excelsior Vittoria. Fleets of black-tied waiters serve lobster-patty cakes and black-tea mousse with ginger on white china plates.

After a day sizzling in the Positano sun, there’s nothing better than taking a 20-minute ride up to the mountain hamlet of Montepertuso for the cool breezes and the refined, inventive cooking of the Villani sisters.

Don’t let the inauspicious location—on a side street in this large modern resort town—deter you from experiencing some of the coast’s freshest seafood and best pizza.

The beachfront restaurant serves up delicious linguine alle vongole.

Each morning, the chefs of La Cambusa purchase fresh fish and seafood from local fishermen and turn them into dishes like octopus salad, spaghetti with sautéed mussels, and linguini with lobster.