The Amalfi Coast

Restaurants in The Amalfi Coast

Octopus, mussels, and all kinds of fish crop up on the menus of most Amalfi Coast restaurants, many of which afford fantastic people watching on cobbled streets or views of the water. More intrepid foodies won’t mind venturing off the beaten track to seek out some of the best restaurants on the Amalfi Coast that lie outside of the more touristed areas. This is the kind of place where you’ll want to have a few gems in your back pocket, but exploring is half the fun. It’s worth noting that quite a few regional white wines are coming into their own, so it’s worth sampling your host’s recommendation along with your meal. Buon appetito.

Reserve a table under the open loggia at Eolo, in Amalfi; the views are spectacular.
Best known for its zuppa di pesce (fish soup), Da Gemma, in Amalfi, has an outdoor terrace that affords prime people watching.
The menu at La Torre in Salerno features traditional Italian fare.
In Positano, Lo Scoglio is a glass pavilion built on top of a wooden jetty with a fountain directly in the center.
At Donna Rosa, a family-owned Amalfi Coast restaurant, the menu changes frequently and reservations are imperative.

On a coast where the dining choices seem divided between pretentious, overpriced temples of haute cuisine and unmemorable restaurants with their pizza ovens aimed squarely at the tourist masses, it’s refreshing to find a holdout like Da Barracca.

Throughout the Campania region of southern Italy, the Fischetti family is famous for their restaurant in Vallesaccarda Avellino, which for three generations has served Irpinian dishes like ricotta ravioli in walnut sauce, fusilli with artichokes and lamb meatballs, and rabbit in spicy tomato sauc

Located in a back street off Piazza Tasso in the center of Sorrento, this restaurant serves traditional Mediterranean and Neapolitan cuisine.

Campania’s product and restaurant boom owes thanks to Livia and Alfonso Iaccarino, of the Michelin two-starred Don Alfonso 1890 restaurant, in Sant’Agata sui due Golfi, overlooking the Gulf of Naples.

Just as Odysseus navigated the Faraglioni rocks off the south coast of Capri, so does the free shuttle boat from Marina Piccola run by this renowned, jet-set restaurant and beach club.

Family-owned for more than 40 years, this beachfront restaurant is little more than a wooden terrace set in a secluded cove on the Amalfi Coast.

Have lunch at ’E Curti, an osteria in the shadow of Vesuvius, where super-mamma Angela Ceriello cooks regional soul food and her son Enzo D’Alessandro produces nucillo, a potent walnut digestivo.

It may be located on the lower level of a ho-hum hotel, but the food that comes out of this diminutive kitchen is anything but.

The island’s only Michelin-starred restaurant is in the Capri Palace Hotel. Dine on raw red shrimp with asparagus and apple salad followed by cuttlefish-ink ravioli.

In an all-but-hidden alleyway in Anacapri, on the quieter, north side of the island, the Trattoria Il Solitario takes up an outdoor garden in front of a 14th-century bell tower of the Church of Santa Sofia.

It may have slipped a notch or two from its status of celebrity hot spot in the days of Bogie and Jackie O—admittedly it’s now a bit of a tourist trap—but such a relentlessly friendly place is hard to resist.

Eat on the garden terrace, suspended almost a thousand feet above the sea in Castellabate.

Product curators Annamaria Cuomo and Salvatore Da Gennaro have assembled a wonderland of Campanian foodstuffs: San Marzano tomatoes handpicked in the Vesuvian soil; ricotta smoked over juniper; and the sack-shaped local raw cow’s-milk cheese provolone del Monaco, which Salvatore ages in