The Amalfi Coast

Restaurants in The Amalfi Coast

Octopus, mussels, and all kinds of fish crop up on the menus of most Amalfi Coast restaurants, many of which afford fantastic people watching on cobbled streets or views of the water. More intrepid foodies won’t mind venturing off the beaten track to seek out some of the best restaurants on the Amalfi Coast that lie outside of the more touristed areas. This is the kind of place where you’ll want to have a few gems in your back pocket, but exploring is half the fun. It’s worth noting that quite a few regional white wines are coming into their own, so it’s worth sampling your host’s recommendation along with your meal. Buon appetito.

Reserve a table under the open loggia at Eolo, in Amalfi; the views are spectacular.
Best known for its zuppa di pesce (fish soup), Da Gemma, in Amalfi, has an outdoor terrace that affords prime people watching.
The menu at La Torre in Salerno features traditional Italian fare.
In Positano, Lo Scoglio is a glass pavilion built on top of a wooden jetty with a fountain directly in the center.
At Donna Rosa, a family-owned Amalfi Coast restaurant, the menu changes frequently and reservations are imperative.

Each morning, the chefs of La Cambusa purchase fresh fish and seafood from local fishermen and turn them into dishes like octopus salad, spaghetti with sautéed mussels, and linguini with lobster.

Although the entrance to this 140-year-old trattoria in the Amalfi Coast is off a narrow backstreet, the floral, outdoor terrace on the second floor overlooks the busy Via Lorenzo and holds the most ambiance in the otherwise modestly decorated restaurant.

Just west of Capri’s central “piazzetta,” Da Giorgio restaurant operates out of the hotel of the same name, serving traditional island fare like linguine with redfish sauce, scialatielli with prawns, and beef fillet in a red wine sauce.

The view: Terrace tables at Rosellinis—in the Palazzo Sasso—look out on the craggy cliffs and coves of the Amalfi Coast, where fishing boats dot the cerulean waters of the Mediterranean 1,000 feet below.

Located up a winding, stepped alleyway, the pizzeria is easy to miss; patrons often get lost looking it or stumble upon it while looking for something else.

Throughout the Campania region of southern Italy, the Fischetti family is famous for their restaurant in Vallesaccarda Avellino, which for three generations has served Irpinian dishes like ricotta ravioli in walnut sauce, fusilli with artichokes and lamb meatballs, and rabbit in spicy tomato sauc

Family-owned for more than 40 years, this beachfront restaurant is little more than a wooden terrace set in a secluded cove on the Amalfi Coast.

Just as Odysseus navigated the Faraglioni rocks off the south coast of Capri, so does the free shuttle boat from Marina Piccola run by this renowned, jet-set restaurant and beach club.

Product curators Annamaria Cuomo and Salvatore Da Gennaro have assembled a wonderland of Campanian foodstuffs: San Marzano tomatoes handpicked in the Vesuvian soil; ricotta smoked over juniper; and the sack-shaped local raw cow’s-milk cheese provolone del Monaco, which Salvatore ages in

Built in a former stone quarry, this family-owned restaurant has an outdoor terrace that juts out over the Gulf of Salerno, providing views of the surrounding cliffs and the yachts floating on the water below.

Named after the three iconic rock outcrops off Capri’s south coast, this restaurant just south of the central piazzetta holds fast to tradition, not just in the simply decorated, white interior, but in the menu as well.

Located in the fishing village of Bacoli, this small seafood restaurant is set on a cobblestoned street overlooking a marina on the Tyrrhenian Sea.

Chef Gennaro Esposito creates innovative dishes, such as risotto with cod and figs, in a seventh-century tower.

The namesake restaurant of Hotel Lo Scoglio da Tommaso, this family-owned trattoria serves locally inspired Mediterranean fare amid panoramic views of Nerano Bay.