The Amalfi Coast

Restaurants in The Amalfi Coast

Chef Gennaro Esposito creates innovative dishes, such as risotto with cod and figs, in a seventh-century tower.

Located on a cliff in the small village of Montepertuso, this popular restaurant serves traditional, regional dishes with an emphasis on local ingredients.

Each morning, the chefs of La Cambusa purchase fresh fish and seafood from local fishermen and turn them into dishes like octopus salad, spaghetti with sautéed mussels, and linguini with lobster.

The namesake restaurant of Hotel Lo Scoglio da Tommaso, this family-owned trattoria serves locally inspired Mediterranean fare amid panoramic views of Nerano Bay.

Strolling down the Via Vittorio Emanuele extending south from Capri’s central “piazzetta,” the air fills with the sweet smell of baking waffle cones and bowls coming from the open-arch front window of Gelateria Buonocore.

The colorful osteria on the dirt road that leads to Punta Licosa serves delicious local favorites and organic fresh fish.

Though the seafood is fresh and expertly prepared and the pizzas from the brick oven are quite good, you don’t really come here for the fairly standard cuisine.

Although the entrance to this 140-year-old trattoria in the Amalfi Coast is off a narrow backstreet, the floral, outdoor terrace on the second floor overlooks the busy Via Lorenzo and holds the most ambiance in the otherwise modestly decorated restaurant.

A key stop on any pizza tour of Italy, this eatery in the center of Vico Equense gained notoriety in the 1950's with its exceptionally long pizzas sold by the meter.

Don’t be put off by the touristy effects (English menu; serenading guitar player). Try the tomato-filled ravioli in fish sauce, or the zucchini flowers stuffed with ricotta. But be warned: portions are nouvelle (i.e., small).

Just west of Capri’s central “piazzetta,” Da Giorgio restaurant operates out of the hotel of the same name, serving traditional island fare like linguine with redfish sauce, scialatielli with prawns, and beef fillet in a red wine sauce.

The view: Terrace tables at Rosellinis—in the Palazzo Sasso—look out on the craggy cliffs and coves of the Amalfi Coast, where fishing boats dot the cerulean waters of the Mediterranean 1,000 feet below.

Pasquale Torrente, owner of Al Convento restaurant, describes colatura-making (anchovy oil) with a semi-pagan glee: the fishing under a spring moon, the curing in barrels with chestnuts or lemons.

Located in the village of Ponteromito and operating since 1908, this restaurant serves traditional, regional dishes. Homemade pasta dishes, like ricotta-stuffed ravioli topped with a walnut and mushroom sauce, are specialties.

Located up a winding, stepped alleyway, the pizzeria is easy to miss; patrons often get lost looking it or stumble upon it while looking for something else.