The Amalfi Coast

Restaurants in The Amalfi Coast

The view: Terrace tables at Rosellinis—in the Palazzo Sasso—look out on the craggy cliffs and coves of the Amalfi Coast, where fishing boats dot the cerulean waters of the Mediterranean 1,000 feet below.

Just west of Capri’s central “piazzetta,” Da Giorgio restaurant operates out of the hotel of the same name, serving traditional island fare like linguine with redfish sauce, scialatielli with prawns, and beef fillet in a red wine sauce.

Pasquale Torrente, owner of Al Convento restaurant, describes colatura-making (anchovy oil) with a semi-pagan glee: the fishing under a spring moon, the curing in barrels with chestnuts or lemons.

Located in the village of Ponteromito and operating since 1908, this restaurant serves traditional, regional dishes. Homemade pasta dishes, like ricotta-stuffed ravioli topped with a walnut and mushroom sauce, are specialties.

Located up a winding, stepped alleyway, the pizzeria is easy to miss; patrons often get lost looking it or stumble upon it while looking for something else.

Positano’s most stylish bar and restaurant serves freshly made, regionally sourced dishes—like fried ravioli with ricotta and mozzarella on a bed of fresh tomatoes—in a slick interior with floor cushions and a softly lit courtyard.

On a coast where the dining choices seem divided between pretentious, overpriced temples of haute cuisine and unmemorable restaurants with their pizza ovens aimed squarely at the tourist masses, it’s refreshing to find a holdout like Da Barracca.

Throughout the Campania region of southern Italy, the Fischetti family is famous for their restaurant in Vallesaccarda Avellino, which for three generations has served Irpinian dishes like ricotta ravioli in walnut sauce, fusilli with artichokes and lamb meatballs, and rabbit in spicy tomato sauc

Located in a back street off Piazza Tasso in the center of Sorrento, this restaurant serves traditional Mediterranean and Neapolitan cuisine.

Campania’s product and restaurant boom owes thanks to Livia and Alfonso Iaccarino, of the Michelin two-starred Don Alfonso 1890 restaurant, in Sant’Agata sui due Golfi, overlooking the Gulf of Naples.

Family-owned for more than 40 years, this beachfront restaurant is little more than a wooden terrace set in a secluded cove on the Amalfi Coast.

Just as Odysseus navigated the Faraglioni rocks off the south coast of Capri, so does the free shuttle boat from Marina Piccola run by this renowned, jet-set restaurant and beach club.

Have lunch at ’E Curti, an osteria in the shadow of Vesuvius, where super-mamma Angela Ceriello cooks regional soul food and her son Enzo D’Alessandro produces nucillo, a potent walnut digestivo.