Napa Valley

Napa Valley Travel Guide

The former owner of a construction company in the 1960’s, Joseph Phelps decided to start his own winery after being commissioned to build Souverain, leading to the first vintage of the now famous Insignia in 1974.

Situated on Diamond Mountain, this small, family-owned winery was established by Rudy von Strasser, who began his career as the first American intern to work at the renowned French winery Château Lafite Rothschild.

Looking for an 18th-century silver candelabra? How about a vintage Eames chaise longue? The whimsical boutique, which doubles as a gallery and wine-tasting salon, stocks an eclectic collection of unconventional art, antiques, and furniture.

A stop along the winery-laden Silverado Trail, this particular edifice was built with stone and wood materials to evoke the aura of something between a castle and farm.

Located next to the Rutherford Grill, Beaulieu Vineyards—or BV as it is known to most—is Napa’s longest-operating winery, dating back to 1900.

As Napa Valley became a hotbed during the silver rush in the 1850’s, the Silverado Trail was completed for a more efficient route between the southern end of Napa and northern end of Calistoga.

Before he was elected San Francisco’s youngest-ever mayor, Gavin Newsom had found other ways to stir up the local establishment.

Salsa and Latin funk play in the background at this downtown wine tasting room, which serves award-winning wines from the family-owned Ceja Vineyards.

Founder Jean-Noel Formeaux du Sartel affectionately named this winery after his family’s 900-year-old castle in France, although the tasting room and surrounding estate don’t bear much of a resemblance.

There is, perhaps, no greater influence on the Napa Valley than Robert Mondavi and his eponymous winery.

Architect Michael Graves turned to the ancient civilivations of the Mediterrean when considering the Postmodern design of Clos Pegase. The god of wine, Dionysus, figures prominently throughout the grounds and main building, which was inspired by a temple on Crete.

Pinot noir thrives in Napa Valley’s Carneros region—a reason that this winery has succeeded in revolutionizing the California wine industry since its inception in 1981.

Some of the friendliest pourers in Napa staff the tasting room of this winery, where the surrounding canopy of sycamore trees makes you feel miles away from Highway 29 (in fact, it’s just a quarter-mile away).

Founded in 1971 by eccentric, sometimes gruff brothers Stuart and Charles Smith, this winery encompasses some 200 secluded acres atop Spring Mountain. Large madrone trees can be found on the estate, giving the winery the second half of its name.