Napa Valley

Restaurants in Napa Valley

One of Napa’s most recognizable restaurateurs, Cindy Pawlcyn opened this restaurant as an ode to her culinary-inspired globetrotting. Originally built in the 1800’s, the building has served turns as a private residence, bordello, and cooperage.

Grab a table by the fireplace at this rustic-yet-elegant bistro, for escargots, coq au vin, and fine wines.

Located in the downtown Bel Aire Plaza shopping center, this restaurant is owner Gene Tartaglia’s ode to Memphis-style slow-cooked barbecue.

Join the locals for a cup of house-roasted java (Clean Teeth Murray’s is a favorite blend).

An all-vegetarian restaurant—never mind one with an attached yoga studio—may seem at odds with the epicurean indulgences of wine country. But for many (including some of the country’s top restaurant critics), that notion has been challenged by a meal at Ubuntu.

After being open for more than 20 years, Terra restaurant finally acquired its liquor license in 2010. That's whenowners Hiro Sone and Lissa Doumani split the space in two and opened Bar Terra next door for more casual dining.

Within the Meadownwood resort, this restaurant has a country cottage setting with a wood-beamed ceiling, large mirrors, and a dark wood bar. Views of the Mayacamas Mountains surrounding the resort are clearer during the day, when lunch is served on the patio.

A stone façade constructed in 1886 marks the entrance of this downtown steakhouse, which is located in the original Williams-Kyser building. Greg Cole and Elizabeth Fairbairn opened Cole's in 2000, and are known for their certified-Angus steaks, seafood, and extensive wine list.

Located within the Mount View Hotel in downtown Calistoga, Barolo is a small restaurant with red leather booths, a marble bar and tabletops, and varied artistic light fixtures.

Sometimes, even when you’re traveling among the world’s high temples of gastronomy, all you really want is a good, messy hamburger.

The flagship restaurant of the Plumpjack Winery—owned Carneros Inn, Farm combines the architectural elements of an American farmhouse, including a central hearth, hardwood floors, and an A-frame roof, with the styling of a contemporary restaurant—open kitchen, white tablecloths, and purple booths

A cutout of a wild pig hanging from the rafters of Oxbow Public Market denotes the entrance to this food- and wine-focused antique shop.